Kansas Speech-Language-Hearing Association - Event Information


Event Name:Virtual Poster Session 2020
Description:COVID-19 caused KSHA to cancel its annual conference. However, we want to share and honor the work of Kansas SLP and AUD students by offering a virtual poster session. KSHA members can view these posters online anytime between October 1-31 and earn up to two hours of continuing education.

Registration is required (free for KSHA members). In addition, participants must complete a brief survey after viewing the posters to receive ASHA CEUs.

Once you have registered, you will receive an email with the link to view the posters, as well as the link to complete the survey.


This course is offered for up to 0.2 ASHA CEUs (Various levels, professional area)
 
Presenter financial and non-financial disclosures: Click HERE

Posters:


An Investigation of Complications with Earmold Impression Protocols
Stefanie Abdayem, Ray Hull
Wichita State University

Earmold impressions are an invasive procedure. National guidelines or protocols do not currently exist. The purpose of this study was to determine if audiologists in Kansas indicate consistency in earmold impression protocols without guidelines, and determine if audiologists in Kansas experience complications while taking earmold impressions. Surveys were distributed to audiologists in KSHA and 36 responses were collected. Audiologists in Kansas appeared to have consistency in taking ear impressions, and many experienced no complications.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: determine if audiologists in Kansas indicate consistency in earmold impression protocols in the absence of national agency guidelines; determine if audiologists in Kansas experience complications while taking earmold impressions, and what factors may contribute to the complications.

Stefanie Abdayem is an Audiology Graduate Student at Wichita State University

Ray Hull is a Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Capstone project mentor.
 
Aphasia Friendly Readings: A Family-Centered Therapy Approach

Breanna Recker, Erin O'Bryan
Wichita State University

This presentation is a collaboration between the spouse of a person with aphasia, a graduate clinician, and a clinical supervisor. The spouse shares the background on how he developed Aphasia-Friendly Readings, an original family-centered responsive reading therapy approach. The structure, format, and procedure for the readings will be described. Video recordings of reading sessions were transcribed and analyzed for content and accuracy. Functional benefits of the reading program for this couple will be discussed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: describe a dyadic therapeutic reading activity developed by the spouse of a person with aphasia; discuss the benefits of the therapeutic activity noted by the spouse and researchers; report the spouse and researchers’ plan for sharing the therapeutic reading activity with other aphasia group members and their significant others.

Breanna Recker is a graduate student in Communication and Sciences Disorders at Wichita State University, an accredited speech-language pathology MA program. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree in linguistics from Iowa State University. While at Wichita State, she plans to explore the many opportunities speech-language pathology offers. Her current interests are to serve individuals with dementia and stroke survivors along with other neurological based disorders in a medical setting. Breanna's research interests focus on aphasia treatment.

Erin O'Bryan, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) at Wichita State University. Dr. O'Bryan is a licensed and certified Speech-Language Pathologist who has provided skilled speech-language therapy in Kansas (full licensure), Indiana (full licensure), and Arizona (Clinical Fellowship). Dr. O'Bryan's research interests include aphasia treatment, verb event structure, and sentence comprehension and production.
 
Computerized Sentence Building as a Treatment for Aphasia

Addison Powell, Daphne Keese, Erin O'Bryan
Wichita State University Communication Sciences & Disorders

This presentation reports results from a treatment study examining whether a computerized sentence building task has therapeutic value for people with aphasia. The treatment is based on a sentence processing task known as the word maze. Six people with aphasia performed the task once or twice per week in forty-minute long periods for a total of 7-8 sessions. All participants showed improved task accuracy and increased scores on the Assessment for Living with Aphasia.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: describe how people with aphasia were trained to navigate through a sentence in a computerized sentence building task as a potential therapy for sentence production; report standardized assessment scores and accuracy scores that improved after doing the computerized sentence building task for 7 to 8 sessions; discuss participants' ratings of how fun, difficult, and helpful they found the computerized sentence building task.

Addison Powell is a graduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Wichita State University, an accredited speech-language pathology MA program. While she appreciates and plans to take advantage of the diversity that speech-language pathology has to offer, her current desire is to focus on serving survivors of stroke, traumatic brain injuries, dementia, and other neurological based disorders in a medical setting. Addison's research interests focus on aphasia treatment.

Daphne J. Keese is a first-year graduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Wichita State University. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in elementary education from Missouri State University. Her research interests include aphasia treatment, memory and cognition strategies, and literacy skills. Her future plans include working with adults in rehab and long term care settings.

Erin O'Bryan, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) at Wichita State University. Dr. O'Bryan is a licensed and certified Speech-Language Pathologist who has provided skilled speech-language therapy in Kansas (full licensure), Indiana (full licensure), and Arizona (Clinical Fellowship). Dr. O'Bryan's research interests include aphasia treatment, verb event structure, and sentence comprehension and production.
Effects of Varying Melodic Intervals during Melodic Intonation Therapy for Persons with Aphasia
Kylie Darland, Erin O'Bryan, Cynthia Richburg, Elaine Bernstorf
Wichita State University


Melodic Intonation Therapy has long been a popular evidence-based treatment for persons with aphasia. However, little research has been done to determine the contribution of specific melodic intervals to the efficacy of MIT. The current study is an MIT treatment study that examines the effects of using two different melodic intervals. Results of the treatment study will be presented, including treatment data, Western Aphasia Battery-R Scores, and Assessment of Living with Aphasia scores.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: identify the effects of using of varying melodic intervals during Melodic Intonation Therapy for persons with Aphasia; describe basic limitations of using Melodic Intonation Therapy as a speech-language pathologist with no formal music training.

Kylie Darland is a graduate student in the Speech-Langauge Pathology program at Wichita State University. She completed her bachelor's in Communication Sciences and Disorders before beginning the master's program in fall 2019. Her interests include the use of music in speech therapy, and Melodic Intonation Therapy for persons with aphasia. After graduating in May 2021, Kylie hopes to work at a rehabilitation facility.

Erin O'Bryan, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) at Wichita State University. Dr. O'Bryan is a licensed and certified Speech-Language Pathologist who has provided skilled speech-language therapy in Kansas (full licensure), Indiana (full licensure), and Arizona (Clinical Fellowship). Dr. O'Bryan's research interests include aphasia treatment, verb event structure, and sentence comprehension and production.

Cynthia M. Richburg, PhD, CCC-A is a Professor and AuD Program Coordinator in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Wichita State University. She has 30 years of experience working as a clinical audiologist, in addition to holding previous faculty positions at the University of Utah, State University of New York - New Paltz, Missouri State University, and Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Richburg is the co-author of two textbooks: "School Based Audiology" (Plural) and "Children with Audiological Needs: From Identification to Aural Rehabilitation" (Butte). She is the current SIG 9 "Perspectives" editor, and her research includes central auditory processing and noise effects on health and learning.

Dr. Bernstorf is a Professor of Music Education at Wichita State University, and co-author of two editions of The Music and Literacy Connection. She also holds a certificate of clinical competence as a speech-language pathologist from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Her specializations include elementary vocal music, special music education, early childhood arts education, speech pathology (especially in the areas of voice, fluency, and child language), literacy development, and curriculum development.
Examining the Effects of Vaping on Laryngeal Health and Function

Audrey Shamburg, Emily Wools, Zoie Stewart
Fort Hays State University

The purpose of this study is to examine the potential effects of vaping on laryngeal health and function of ENDS device users. Participants complete a survey, computerized speech lab (CSL) analysis tasks, auditory/perceptual tasks, and a laryngeal examination using videostroboscopy. Results of auditory/perceptual findings and CSL voice analysis tasks for participants one and two are grossly within normal limits. Further results will be presented and conclusions drawn after all participants have been evaluated.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: identify normal and abnormal laryngeal features given a superior view of a larynx; discuss the potential effects vaping has on laryngeal health and function; explain the importance of researching the effects ENDS devices have on laryngeal health and function.

Audrey Shamburg, B.S. is a graduate student in the Communication Sciences and Disorders department at Fort Hays State University. Upon graduation, she would like to work in early intervention.

Emily Wools, B.S. is a graduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Fort Hays State University. Upon graduating, she wants to work in an educational setting. She has special interest working with individuals who use AAC devices.

Zoie Stewart, B.S. is a graduate student in the Communication Sciences and Disorders department at Fort Hays State University. Upon graduating, she plans to work in the educational setting. She has a special interest in specializing in ASD and would like to teach an introductory SLP class at a community college.
 
Exploration of SLP Student Anxiety in Preparing for the First Diagnostic Interview

Karmen Porter, Marcus Porter, Emma Harmon, Madison Shandy, Maeve Spangler
Fort Hays State University

This research examined SLP graduate student anxiety during preparation for their initial diagnostic interview. Using mixed methods, qualitative data was collected through open-ended journal prompts that measured anxiety and preparedness, and quantitative data was collected through the Situational Communication Apprehension Measure (SCAM). The SCAM results showed that anxiety was highest immediately before the interview and dropped significantly after. Qualitative analysis of student comments revealed common themes of deficits, self-perceptions, and task perceptions.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: discuss the potential benefits of using IIs to help students reduce anxiety before a clinical experience; describe various types stressors that can influence student clinician performance during a during a clinical experience.

Karmen Porter is an Assistant Professor and Chair of the CSD Department at Fort Hays State University. She is a certified speech-language pathologist. Her research interests and teaching include language development/disorders, fluency disorders, and SLP communication and collaboration with clients, caregivers, and healthcare professionals.

Marcus Porter serves Fort Hays State University as the Credit for Prior Learning Coordinator. His research focuses on processing communication.

Emma Harmon is undergraduate student attending Fort Hays State University majoring in communication sciences and disorders. She is interested in early intervention.

Madison Shandy is currently a senior at Fort Hays State University but is attending graduate school at Fort Hays in the fall of 2020. She is interested in working with children and is considering early intervention.

Maeve Spangler is from a small town in Kansas. Maeve studied her undergraduate degree in communication sciences and disorders at Fort Hays State University. She plans to attend graduate school at Fort Hays State University for speech-language pathology.
 
Influence of Vocabulary Depth and Breadth on Text Type

Claire Elliott, Mindy Bridges
University of Kansas

Participants in this study included students in Grade 6 across the Midwest who have been followed since kindergarten as part of a longitudinal study. As part of this study, students were administered assessments of vocabulary breadth and depth in kindergarten. Multiple regression will be conducted to see how these scores predict their reading comprehension of expository and narrative text in 6th grade.   Clinical implications will also be addressed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: describe the difference between vocabulary depth and breadth; explain the relationship between these types of vocabulary and reading comprehension; understand clinical implications for the impact of vocabulary depth and breadth on reading comprehension in middle school.

Claire Elliott is a second-year graduate student at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City. She will graduate with her Master of Arts in speech-language pathology in May 2020. She enjoys working with school-age children and has research interests in language and literacy.

Mindy Sittner Bridges is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Hearing & Speech at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Her research interests include the relationship between language and reading development and disorders.
 
Maximum Phonation Time Norms: To Give or Not to Give?

Emily Wools, Zoie Stewart, Blake Roth, Qiang Li
Fort Hays State University

The purpose of this study was to determine if priming participants by giving them normative data prior to sustaining a maximum phonation time (MPT) would influence their performance. Participants were randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 received the normative value for MPT duration in their instructions, while Group 2 did not receive the value. The preliminary mean MPT duration for Group 1 was 14.2 seconds and for Group 2 was 13.1 seconds.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: describe the importance of giving clear instructions to voice clients; discuss the impact normative influence has on MPT performance; explain the effects normative influence could have on performance.

Emily Wools, B.S. is a graduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Fort Hays State University. Upon graduating, she wants to work in an educational setting. She has special interest working with individuals who use AAC devices.

Zoie Stewart, B.S. is a graduate student in the Communication Sciences and Disorders department at Fort Hays State University. Upon graduating, she plans to work in the educational setting. She has a special interest in specializing in ASD and would like to teach an introductory SLP class at a community college.

Blake Roth, M.S. is an instructor within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Fort Hays State University. He has an interest in voice and voice disorders from an academic, research, and clinical perspective.

Qiang Li, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Fort Hays State University. He is interested in neurogenic communication disorders, particularly motor speech disorders. He is now working on acoustic analysis of prosody in persons with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease.
 
Noise Exposure in Wine Making: Employee Knowledge and Attitudes

Shelby Barnhardt, Cynthia M. Richburg
Wichita State University

This presentation sought to survey employees in small wineries, in Kansas and surrounding states, about their knowledge of noise-induced hearing loss and their attitudes toward hearing conservation. Questionnaires were distributed to employees for collection. Findings including the usage of hearing protection devices, general knowledge related to noise exposure, and the likelihood to protect hearing in the future will be discussed in the presentation.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: describe employees in wine making facilities use of hearing protection; discuss those employees’ attitudes about hearing protection.

Shelby Barnhardt is an audiology graduate student at Wichita State University. She graduated from Wichita State with her Bachelor of Arts in Communication Sciences and Disorders.

Cynthia M. Richburg, PhD, CCC-A is Professor and AuD Program Coordinator in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Wichita State University. She has 30 years of experience working as a clinical audiologist, in addition to holding previous faculty positions at the University of Utah, State University of New York - New Paltz, Missouri State University, and Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Richburg is the co-author of two textbooks: School-Based Audiology (Plural) and Children with Audiological Needs: From Identification to Aural Rehabilitation (Butte). She is the current SIG 9 Perspectives editor, and her research includes central auditory processing and noise effects on health and learning.
Parents' Perceptions of a Summer Literacy Camp at Wichita State University

Karissa Marble-Flint, PhD,CCC-SLP, Kassidy Brittain, BA
Wichita State University

Children engaged in summer literacy activities advance their skills, while children not engaged in such activities may regress, losing valuable time when the academic year commences (Sandberg, Patton & Reschley, 2013). To support literacy skill advancement, a camp for first and second graders was held at Wichita State University (WSU). This poster provides an overview of WSU Summer Literacy Camp 2019 including sample intervention activities and survey results of parents' perspectives.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: explain components of a six-week literacy camp intervention program; discuss parent(s)' and caregiver(s)' perceptions of their child’s involvement in a six-week literacy camp.

Karissa Marble-Flint, PhD, CCC-SLP is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Wichita State University (WSU) in Wichita, Kansas.  Her major research, teaching, and clinical interests include language and literacy in childhood, literacy and autism spectrum disorder, and technology for language-literacy assessment and intervention. Dr. Marble-Flint is the coordinator of the Literacy in Kansas (LinKS) Lab at WSU.

Kassidy Brittain, BA, is a graduate student in the Master of Arts program in speech-language pathology in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Wichita State University in Wichita, Kansas.  She has clinical experience working as a speech-language pathology paraprofessional in an educational setting.  Her current area of research is language and literacy in school-aged children. Her other clinical and research interests include Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) and Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Reimagining Diagnostic Interview Training in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Madisson Jesse, Callie Riffel, Karmen Porter, Marcus Porter
Fort Hays State University

The purpose of this research is to examine how first year speech-language pathology graduate students perceive the utility of Imagined Interactions (IIs) as a clinical teaching tool to prepare for diagnostic interviews. Qualitative data was collected through questionnaires that were utilized to gather student perspectives. Analysis of the responses revealed that students found IIs to be a useful tool, noting that they helped prepare for necessary tasks, increase positive feelings, define expectations, and consider perspectives.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: define and describe Imagined Interactions (IIs.); determine the perceptive efficacy of the use of IIs in clinical interviews; apply the basic concept of Imagined Interactions (IIs) to prepare for a clinical experience.

Madisson Jesse is a graduate student at Fort Hays State University. She will graduate with a master's degree in Speech-Language Pathology in 2021. Upon completion of her degree, she is interested in working in a medical setting.

Callie Riffel is a graduate student at Fort Hays State University. She received her undergraduate degree at Kansas State University. Upon completion of her degree, she hopes to be working with children in a school setting.

Karmen Porter is an Assistant Professor and Chair of the CSD Department at Fort Hays State University. She is a certified speech-language pathologist. Her research interests and teaching include language development/disorders, fluency disorders, and SLP communication and collaboration with clients, caregivers, and healthcare professionals.

Marcus Porter serves Fort Hays State University as the Credit for Prior Learning Coordinator. His research focuses on processing communication.
 
Speech-Language Pathology: The Best Kept Secret?

Kayla Reid, Darah Bohl, Remington Clark, Katja Mayhak, Carol Ellis
Fort Hays State University

This study investigated what students from Fort Hays State University know about the profession of speech-language pathology. Non-major students completed a survey regarding their knowledge and exposure to the speech-language profession to identify any possible awareness trends and/or related factors. Results included fair knowledge of the profession with some gaps.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: discuss students’ knowledge of the SLP profession in the areas of types of populations served, work settings, ages served, and level of education needed; identify any trends in student knowledge regarding gender, academic classification, and academic major; identify the top methods of exposure that university students experience regarding the field of speech-language pathology.

Kayla Reid is a graduate student in speech-language pathology at Fort Hays State University. She collaborated with her team to determine Fort Hays State University (FHSU) students' knowledge of the profession of speech-language pathology. In addition, the research team will determine FHSU students' exposure to the field and identify any trends regarding level of awareness among specific groups of FHSU students. Kayla is interested in seeing the level of FHSU student knowledge of the profession.

Darah Bohl is a graduate student in speech-language pathology at Fort Hays State University. She collaborated with her team to determine undergraduate and graduate Fort Hays State University (FHSU) students’ knowledge of the profession of speech-language pathology. Her research interests include seeing how the university students respond to what settings speech-language pathologists work in.

Remington Clark is a second-year graduate student studying speech-language pathology at Fort Hays State University. Her research interests include acquired cognitive-communication disorders, autism spectrum disorders, language in infants through preschoolers, augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), language disorders in adults, and leadership and professional issues.

Katja Mayhak, a graduate student in speech-language pathology at Fort Hays State University, is interested in learning what FHSU students know about the SLP profession and determine their exposure to the field and identify trends regarding levels of awareness among specific groups of FHSU students. In collaboration with Darah, Remington, and Kayla, she hopes this research will help decrease the shortage of SLPs. Other interests include childhood apraxia of speech and pediatric dysphagia.

Carol Ellis, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department at Fort Hays State University in Hays, Kansas. The focus of her research is applied phonetics and phonology with interests in speech intelligibility and accent modification. She teaches a variety of courses including phonetics, language science, early speech and language development, speech sound disorders, accent modification for international speakers, and multicultural diversity.
 
Stability of Vocal Variables Measured During the Early Communication Indicator for Children with ASD

Jena McDaniel, Paul Yoder, Annette Estes, Sally Rogers
University of Kansas

We evaluated using the 6-min Early Communication Indicator (ECI) procedure for a new purpose - a sampling context for vocal development of young children with autism spectrum disorder. We evaluated how many ECI sessions were required for adequately stable measures of volubility, communicative use, and phonological complexity of vocalizations at two periods. One to three sessions were required with relatively fewer sessions required for the phonological complexity variables and at the later time point.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: list at least three vocal development variables; describe how the number of sessions is expected to affect the stability of measures; describe how the number of sessions required for a stale estimate of vocal development is influenced by time (e.g., younger versus older children).

Jena McDaniel, PhD, CCC-SLP is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Life Span Institute at the University of Kansas. She earned her PhD from the Vanderbilt University Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences. Her research interests include language intervention for children who are deaf and hard of hearing and children with autism spectrum disorder. She previously worked as a speech-language pathologist at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

Paul Yoder, PhD, previously worked as a professor in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. He studied child and environmental factors that influenced or predicted communication and language development in preschoolers and toddlers with disabilities for over 30 years. He is now retired.

Annette Estes, PhD, is the director of the University of Washington Autism Center, holds the Susan and Richard Fade Endowed Chair, is a Research Professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, and an Adjunct Research Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Washington. Dr. Estes is especially interested in the role of the family in supporting positive outcomes for children with disabilities and improving the lives of people with ASD.

Sally J. Rogers is a developmental psychologist, licensed psychologist, and Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at UCDavis. She has been principal investigator of a CPEA program project from NICHD and two NIMH/NICHD funded Autism Centers of Excellence network multi?site randomized controlled trials of infant?toddler treatment for autism. Awards include: 2007 INSAR Outstanding Leadership and Service, 2008 UCDavis School of Medicine Research Award, and American Psychological Association 2013 John W. Jacobsen Career Award.
 
The Impact of a Tutoring Center for Undergraduate Students Majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Brooke Wineinger, Blake Roth
Fort Hays State University

This study aimed to determine the impact of a tutoring center for students majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Researchers analyzed students' academic data in relation to tutor center attendance. Results indicated a statistically significant difference in exam scores between those who attended the tutor center and those who did not. Researchers can conclude that a tutor center program can be effective in increasing exam scores for students majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: discuss the importance of implementing a tutoring center program in undergraduate Communication Sciences and Disorders programs; explain the benefits of a tutoring center program for students in Communication Sciences and Disorders programs; recommend that peer-tutoring centers be implemented in Communication Sciences and Disorders programs.

Brooke Wineinger is a graduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Fort Hays State University. She has completed several research topics throughout her educational career. Upon completion of her Master's degree, she plans to obtain her Ph.D. and would like to work in an early intervention setting.

Blake Roth is an instructor within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Fort Hays State University. He thoroughly enjoys teaching, research, and clinical education and has a strong desire to see students succeed.
The Impact of Amplification on QoL and Communication Confidence in Women with Turner Syndrome

Lindsey VanLooy, Lauren Mann, Marybel Good, Jinxiang Hu, Lauren Mann, Marybel Good
The University of Kansas Medical Center

The goal of this study was to determine if adult women with Turner Syndrome who treat hearing loss with hearing aids exhibit greater quality of life and communication confidence, compared to those that do not. Participants (n=175) completed a RedCap questionnaire that included The Communication Confidence Profile (CCP) and the RAND 36-Item Health Survey. Overall, survey results are mixed regarding effect of hearing aids.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: describe the hearing loss commonly seen in women with Turner Syndrome; evaluate the effectiveness of amplification as treatment in this population.

Lindsey VanLooy, B.A., is a 4th year Doctor of Audiology Student at The University of Kansas Medical Center. Her areas of interest include  amplification, diagnostics, cochlear implants, tinnitus, hearing loss in rare disease populations, and clinical research. She is currently completing her externship at the Kansas City VA Medical Center.

Lauren Mann, Au.D., CCC-A, FAAA, a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Hearing and Speech, teaches courses in hearing aids and hearing disorders. She also provides instruction to doctoral candidates and supervises students in the audiology clinics.

Marybel Good’s young adult daughter was diagnosed with TS at birth and had a coarctation of the aorta repaired at two days old. Based in Colorado, Marybel was leader of her local support group from 2010 to 2014, when she founded Turner Syndrome Colorado, an independent 501(c)3 organization.  In 2012, she initiated the process of developing a TS Clinic at Children’s Hospital Colorado and this Clinic began in May 2015. Marybel’s passion is to ensure resources, services, and opportunities so that no girl, woman, or family member ever feels isolated by a diagnosis of TS. With a M.A. degree in Nonprofit Management and prior experience working in Development for nonprofit organizations, Marybel is excited to bring more information and opportunity to the TS community through TSGA.

Jinxiang Hu, Ph.D, is an Assistant Professor at KUMC in the Department of Biostatistics & Data Science. Her research focuses are: patient reported outcome, health disparity, structural equation modeling, item response theory, longitudinal modeling, mixture modeling, and machine learning.
 
The Need for Diversity in the Professions of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology

Amel Mohammed, Cynthia Richburg
Wichita State University

The purpose of this study was to explore the need for greater diversity in CSD professions. Survey responses were collected from 200 students enrolled in Wichita high schools known to have diverse populations. Students were asked about their knowledge of, and interest in, CSD professions. Results indicate that students do not get information about audiology or speech-language pathology early enough, and students from diverse backgrounds believe there is a need for diversity in these professions.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: discuss the reasons why high school students have little information about CSD professions; describe which students can consider diversity important in CSD professions.

Amel Mohammed, BS, is currently a graduate student in the AuD program at Wichita State University. Her undergraduate degree was from Alabama State University and she majored in Biology. Amel will be completing her 3rd-year externship placement at Ohio ENT and Allergy physicians in Columbus, Ohio.  She plans to pursue a position as an audiologist in the military upon graduation.

Cynthia M. Richburg, PhD, CCC-A is Professor and AuD Program Coordinator in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Wichita State University. She has 30 years of experience working as a clinical audiologist, in addition to holding previous faculty positions at the University of Utah, State University of New York ? New Paltz, Missouri State University, and Indiana University of Pennsylvania.  Dr. Richburg is the co-author of two textbooks: School-Based Audiology (Plural) and Children with Audiological Needs: From Identification to Aural Rehabilitation (Butte). She is the current SIG 9 Perspectives editor, and her research includes central auditory processing and noise effects on health and learning.
Training Part C Early Intervention Providers to Screen for Autism Spectrum Disorder

Darby Batchelor, Trisha Self, Douglas Parham  
Wichita State University

This research project was conducted to determine Part C early intervention providers' knowledge of ASD prior to and following training. Participants completed the Autism Stigma and Knowledge Questionnaire prior to and following training. Results indicated that the professionals had a high level of knowledge before training and this level improved after the training. This supports the literature recommending that EI providers be trained in conducting ASD-specific screenings to assist with the early identification of ASD.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: discuss the importance of training Part C providers to screen young children for ASD; identify the components of the Autism Stigma and Knowledge Questionnaire.

Darby Batchelor earned a graduate degree in speech-language pathology from Wichita State University in spring of 2020.

Dr. Trisha Self is an Associate Professor and the Paul M. Cassat Distinguished Chair in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department at Wichita State University in Wichita, Kansas. She teaches courses, supervises, and conducts research in ASD. She is a Board Certified Child Language Specialist with over 30 years experience working with children demonstrating complex communication needs, including ASD. She is the coordinator of the Autism Interdisciplinary Diagnostic and Treatment Team Lab at WSU.

Douglas F. Parham, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Wichita State University. He is the Coordinator for both the MA-CSD and undergraduate programs. His research interests include infant vocalization, speech breathing, typical and atypical speech-language development, physiological instrumentation, and conversational interaction. A licensed and certified speech-language pathologist, he was President of both the Kansas Speech-Language-Hearing Association (KSHA) and the Council of State Association Presidents (CSAP).
Universal Language Promotion in the Primary Care Setting: Implementing the Talk With Me Baby Program

Savannah Howell, Betsy Snell, Corinne Walker, Brenda Salley
University of Kansas

The Talk With Me Baby (TWMB) program trains healthcare and community providers to educate and coach parents and families on the importance of language development. The current study describes the initial training and implementation steps taken to embed this universal language promotion program within a primary care setting with at-risk families. Nursing staff were trained to implement TWMB during standard of care visits. Acceptability data were collected from nurses and from 62 families.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: describe the importance of early language promotion in the first three years of life for child long term academic and health outcomes; identify the purpose and methods of implementing language promotion in the primary care setting; evaluate the benefits and barriers to providing parent education on language development in well-child visits.

Savannah Howell, BA is currently pursuing a Master of Arts in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Kansas Medical Center. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Speech-

Language Hearing Sciences at the University of Kansas. She is a graduate research assistant in the child development lab at the University of Kansas Medical Center.

Betsy Snell, BGS is currently pursuing a Master of Arts in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Kansas Medical Center. She received her Bachelor of General Studies in Psychology and Speech-Language Hearing Sciences at the University of Kansas. She is a graduate research assistant in the child development lab at the University of Kansas Medical Center.

Corinne Walker, MA is a speech-language pathologist working in private practice and as the lab coordinator for the child development lab at the University of Kansas Medical Center.
She is pursuing her PhD at the University of Kansas with a primary area of interest in augmentative and alternative communication.

Brenda Salley, PhD is a clinical developmental psychologist and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Kansas School of Medicine. Her research examines early social, cognitive and language development in typically and atypically developing young children.
 
Use of a think-aloud procedure to examine adolescent strategy use for reading comprehension

Erin Kaul, Mindy Bridges, Kelley Nelson-Strouts
University of Kansas

This preliminary study looked at the relationship between 8th-grade students' responses during a think-aloud procedure and their reading comprehension. A coding system was developed and used to code student utterances.  Codes attempted to clarify strategies used while comprehending expository text. We examined the relationship between strategy use and scores on standardized reading comprehension. We will also examine whether there were gender differences in the type or quantity of strategies used.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: describe what a think-aloud protocol is; identify if a relationship was found between strategy use and reading comprehension.

Erin Kaul, MA-SLP, earned her MA degree from the University of Kansas this year and is a Clinical Fellow working in early intervention in Topeka, Kansas.

Mindy Sittner Bridges, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Her research interests include the relationship between language and reading development and disorders as well as the development of school-based reading interventions.

Kelley Nelson-Strouts, MA, CCC-SLP is a speech-language pathology doctoral student at the University of Kansas. Her primary research interests include how to best evaluate elementary-aged students in the area of reading disorders with a particular interest in alternative assessment practices most appropriate for students from non-mainstream backgrounds.
 
Event Date:10/1/2020 - 10/31/2020
Location:
Event Registration:
Outlook/vCalendar/Google:Click on the icon next to the date(s) to add to your calendar:
10/1/2020 - 10/31/2020
Email Reminder:click here to setup an email reminder for this event


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