Indiana Psychological Association - Event Information


Event Name:2020 IPA VIRTUAL Fall Conference
Event Type(s):CE Events
Description:
2020 IPA VIRTUAL Fall Conference
Thursday, November 19th and Friday, November 20th, 2020
8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. ET Thursday
8:00 a.m. - 3:45 p.m. ET Friday


IPA is proud to announce that the 2020 IPA Fall Conference will be 100% virtual.

Join us for our high quality lineup, headlined by Morgan T. Sammons, Ph.D., ABPP, Executive Officer, National Register of Health Service Psychologists, who will be our keynote speaker on Friday morning. Dr. Sammons will present "After the vaccine:  Will we recognize ourselves in the mirror?"

The two-day event will offer 15 Category I Continuing Education 90-minute presentations via webinar. Attendees can earn up to 12.0 CE hours (6 on Thursday, 6 on Friday).

Registered attendees will receive the webinar links and passwords for each presentation and the presentation slide sets via e-mail approximately one-two weeks prior to the conference.

The 2020 IPA Student Abstract Competition will also take place virtually. Student poster presenters will be sharing a short video describing their poster. IPA will compile these videos and offer a Student Poster Presentation session on Thursday at 11:30 a.m.

The IPA Annual Awards will be presented virtually during the Annual Awards Presentations session on Friday at 11:30 a.m.

Registration ends Sunday, November 15th, 2020.

 
QUICK LINKS:
Conference Schedule
Thursday, November 19th
Friday, November 20th
Special Note to Conference Attendees

Presenter Biographies
Registration Details/Cost-- Register button at very bottom of this page
Sponsors/Exhibitors

 
CONFERENCE SCHEDULE
Thursday, November 19th Friday, November 20th
7:45 - 8:00 Sponsor Messages 7:45 - 8:00 Sponsor Messages
8:00 - 9:30 Concurrent Presentations #1 & #2
Presentation #1:  "Introduction to Emotionally-Focused Couple Therapy (EFT): An Evidence-Based Couple Therapy Model" by Maria P. Hanzlik, Psy.D., HSPP

Presentation #2:  "Trauma Informed Schools:  What are they and what can psychologists do to support them?" by Theresa Kruczek, Ph.D., HSPP
8:00 - 9:30 Presentation #9 Keynote Address
Presentation #9:  "After the vaccine:  Will we recognize ourselves in the mirror?" by Morgan T. Sammons, Ph.D., ABPP


 
9:30 - 9:45 Sponsor Messages & Break 9:30 - 9:45 Sponsor Messages & Break
9:45 - 11:15 Concurrent Presentations #3 & #4
Presentation #3:  "Hot Topics in Training and Supervision: Addressing Race and Racism" by Lauren M. Cunningham, Ph.D, HSPP, Gili Goldfrad, Psy.D., HSPP, & Ruth Viehoff, Psy.D., HSPP

Presentation #4:  "Owning Our Counter-Resistances to Enhancing Therapeutic Gains" by William Alexy, Ph.D., HSPP
9:45 - 11:15 Concurrent Presentations #10 & #11
Presentation #10:  "An Introduction to Adolescent Dialectical Behavior Therapy" by Melissa Butler, Ph.D., HSPP

Presentation #11:  "Giving Psychology Away: Why and How You Can Engage in Advocacy" by Amanda Zelechoski, J.D., Ph.D., ABPP
11:15 - 11:30 Sponsor Messages & Break 11:15 - 11:30 Sponsor Messages & Break
​11:30 - 1:00 Student Poster Presentations 11:30 - 12:15 Annual Award Presentations
1:00 - 1:15 Sponsor Messages & Break 12:15 - 12:30 Sponsor Messages & Break
1:15 - 2:45 Concurrent Presentations #5 & #6
Presentation #5:  "Anything less than your best is unacceptable: Deconstructing maladaptive perfectionism" by Stephanie J. Cunningham, Ph.D., HSPP

Presentation #6:  "Women on the Autism Spectrum: Identifying and Understanding the Female Phenotype of ASD" by Anna Merrill, Ph.D, HSPP
12:30 - 2:00 Concurrent Presentations #12 & #13
Presentation #12:  "PTSD at the End of Life" by Jeffrey D. Lightfoot, Ph.D., HSPP

Presentation #13: "The Interrelationship between Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Delirium, Depression, and Dementia" by Sophia Wang, M.D.
 
2:45 - 3:00 Sponsor Messages & Break 2:00 - 2:15 Sponsor Messages & Break
3:00 - 4:30 Concurrent Presentations #7 & #8
Presentation #7:  "The Role of Psychologists in an Integrated Delivery System Designed for Geriatric Neuropsychiatric Patients in Long-Term Care Settings" by Daniel Heiser, Psy.D., HSPP & Steven Posar, M.D.

Presentation #8:  "Metacognition and Psychosis: A Novel Recovery Oriented and Integrative Approach to Psychotherapy for Adults" by Paul H. Lysaker, Ph.D.
2:15 - 3:45 Concurrent Presentations #14 & #15
Presentation #14:  "Suicide:  From Research to Practice" by Gili Goldfrad, Psy.D, HSPP & Julie T. Steck, Ph.D., HSPP

Presentation #15:  "Applied Ethics:  Using the CASES Approach to Resolve Ethical Dilemmas" by Shannon E. Woller, Psy.D., ABPP, HSPP​
 
 
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19th

7:45 - 8:00 Sponsor Messages

8:00 - 9:30 Concurrent Presentations #1 & #2

 
Presentation #1:  "Introduction to Emotionally-Focused Couple Therapy (EFT): An Evidence-Based Couple Therapy Model" 
Maria P. Hanzlik, Psy.D., HSPP


1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Although psychologists routinely provide individual therapy for patients struggling with anxiety, depression, and trauma, it is less common for psychologists to provide couples therapy given lack of training, comfort, or competence in this modality. This introductory-level presentation will discuss the origins EFT, review of the literature supporting efficacy of the model, explain stages and steps of the model, and demonstrate how to intervene from an EFT framework.

Learning Objectives: 

By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  identify historical influences of other theoretical orientations and approaches in EFT
2.  name 3 stages and 7 steps of EFT
3.  identify 3 specific EFT interventions to facilitate reformulating emotion and restructuring interactions
 


Presentation #2:  "Trauma Informed Schools:  What are they and what can psychologists do to support them?"
Theresa Kruczek, Ph.D., HSPP


1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Trauma informed practices are increasingly important given the current pandemic and socio-political situation. This workshop would begin by briefly reviewing a bioecological model of trauma followed by a discussion of how trauma impacts the academic, social, and behavioral functioning of children and youth. One of the key elements of Trauma Informed Schools (TIS) involves establishing collaborative working relationships with community mental health providers, including psychologists. In this workshop participants will have an opportunity to learn about the principles and practices of Trauma Informed Schools and what role psychologists can play in collaborating with schools to support the recovery and development of children and youth who have experienced traumatic life events.

Learning Objectives: 

By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  identify the principles and practices of Trauma Informed Schools
2.  recognize how cultural, historical and gender issues can impact trauma response
3.  identify the role and function of community psychologists in TIS
4.  identify effective mechanisms of collaboration with schools to support children and families with trauma experiences
5.  utilize culturally responsive, collaborative practices to support underrepresented children, teens and their families
 

9:30 - 9:45 Sponsor Messages & Break

9:45 - 11:15 Concurrent Presentations #3 & #4

 
Presentation #3:  "Hot Topics in Training and Supervision: Addressing Race and Racism"
Lauren M. Cunningham, Ph.D, HSPP, Gili Goldfrad, Psy.D., HSPP, & Ruth Viehoff, Psy.D., HSPP
(image not available)

1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Although conversations about race, racism, and white privilege are encouraged across the diversity of training settings, the application of this focus is varied.  The recent political climate highlighting racist narratives and behaviors has drawn light to racism and white privilege not just in the therapy room but also in the general training environment.  This panel will focus on the ways by which supervisors and training faculty can acknowledge and address racism and white privilege in training while simultaneously promoting anti-racism as a clinical and ethical concern.

Learning Objectives: 

By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  summarize the characteristics of competent supervision, inadequate supervision, and harmful supervision
2.  analyze the ethical obligations training faculty have in acknowledging and addressing racism and white privilege in training
3.  describe the challenges faculty experience while attempting to meet the ethical obligations of acknowledging and addressing racism and white privilege in training
4.  apply the various ways of which faculty challenge racism and white privilege in the training environment


Presentation #4:  "Owning Our Counter-Resistances to Enhancing Therapeutic Gains" 
William Alexy, Ph.D., HSPP

1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Psychodynamically-oriented therapists recognize that clients who avail themselves of psychotherapy harbor unconscious resistances to change. What is not so commonly recognized is that therapists also harbor unconscious resistances to changing their psychological status quo in response to client needs. This dynamic manifests in attitudes and behaviors that impede therapeutic progress. Therapists’ counter-resistances are often similar to and as intense as clients’ resistances to change. Moreover, resolution of client resistances often depend on resolution of therapists’ counter-resistances. Given that all depth-oriented psychotherapists risk having treatment compromised by their counter-resistances, this presentation will give emphasis to discussing the development and resolution of common counter-resistances such as boredom, excessive enthusiasm, advice giving, verbal inhibitions, and garrulousness.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  distinguish differences between countertransference, countertransference vulnerability, and counter-resistance
2.  identify three counter-resistances and their underlying dynamics
3.  describe two approaches to identifying counter-resistances in your clinical practice

 
11:15 - 11:30 Sponsor Messages & Break

11:30 - 1:00 Student Poster Presentations

1:00 - 1:15 Sponsor Messages & Break

1:15 - 2:45 Concurrent Presentations #5 & #6

 
Presentation #5:  "Anything less than your best is unacceptable: Deconstructing maladaptive perfectionism"
Stephanie J. Cunningham, Ph.D., HSPP

1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Striving to perform at our absolute best at all times may seem like a laudable goal, but there is a difference between aiming for this result and expecting it as the default outcome.  Contexts and cultures with a high focus on competition and achievement, where this is also accompanied by a commensurate emphasis on the unacceptability of failure, tend to foster a set of attitudes and behaviors that are typically described as “being a perfectionist.”  Although this concept holds somewhat of a positive connotation in the broader American culture, it is often far from benign in its implications.  Maladaptive perfectionism is the result of an achievement-oriented mindset calcifying into rigid, unrealistic self-expectations that inevitably promote feelings of shame, inadequacy, and demoralization.  This presentation will deconstruct the concept of maladaptive perfectionism, including its roots, its impact, and its negative consequences.  We will address the distinction between maladaptive and adaptive perfectionism, including the implications of these attitudes for performance, achievement, and self-concept.  Extant research on perfectionism will be discussed in which we will explore the link between maladaptive perfectionism and a range of negative wellness-related outcomes, including those that might seem less immediately intuitive, such as physical health, impairment in interpersonal functioning, and risk for suicide.  The presentation will include content on the mental health implications of shifting to an adaptive perfectionist mindset, as well as review of strategies for change when working with clients who demonstrate traits and behaviors indicative of maladaptive perfectionism.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  distinguish between maladaptive and adaptive forms of perfectionism
2.  describe some of the negative implications/outcomes associated with holding a maladaptive perfectionistic mindset
3.  identify intervention strategies for changing beliefs and behaviors associated with maladaptive perfectionism
4.  explain how maladaptive perfectionism may have different presentations and/or implications for individuals from diverse identities and backgrounds


Presentation #6:  "Women on the Autism Spectrum: Identifying and Understanding the Female Phenotype of ASD"
Anna Merrill, Ph.D, HSPP

1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
This presentation will seek to illuminate information regarding Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in females and why it can often go undiagnosed. There is a growing body of literature that suggests that there is a male bias in our understanding of ASD. Women on the autism spectrum are much more likely to be diagnosed later in life or to never receive a formal diagnosis. This presentation will review our growing understanding of how the presentation of symptoms and life experiences of women with ASD may be different from males with ASD. In addition, common co-occurring psychiatric conditions such as anxiety and depression will be reviewed and appropriate implications for treatment will be discussed.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  identify the nature of the female autism phenotype and how it may differ from the presentation of symptoms in males
2.  recognize the factors that contribute to why females with ASD often go undiagnosed or are diagnosed later in life
3.  describe common co-occurring psychiatric concerns and risk factors for females with ASD 
4.  apply understanding of gender differences in ASD to their clinical practice
 

2:45 - 3:00 Sponsor Messages & Break

3:00 - 4:30 Concurrent Presentations #7 & #8

 
Presentation #7:  "The Role of Psychologists in an Integrated Delivery System Designed for Geriatric Neuropsychiatric Patients in Long-Term Care Settings" by Daniel Heiser, Psy.D., HSPP & Steven Posar, M.D.
 
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
This purpose of this presentation is to discuss three central challenges related to the psychological treatment of geriatric and neuropsychiatric patients living in long-term care settings, and the importance of Psychology in diagnosing and treating these patients. These challenges include:
1.  Diagnostic Challenges and Concerns  
2.  Development of a comprehensive treatment plan to treat Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD)
3.  Treatment protocols due to the typical course of decompensation

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  describe the role of psychological assessment in establishing initial diagnosis in the geriatric and neuropsychiatric population
2.  explain assessment in specific supportive treatment of neurodegenerative disorders
3.  discuss the role of anticipatory non-insight based psychological interventions


Presentation #8:  "Metacognition and Psychosis: A Novel Recovery Oriented and Integrative Approach to Psychotherapy for Adults"
Paul H. Lysaker, Ph.D.
 
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
A growing body of research has suggested that many diagnosed with psychosis experience deficits in metacognitive or the ability to form integrated ideas about themselves and others. As a result they may struggle to form evolving and nuanced ideas about the challenges they face and how they might best effectively manage them and move towards recovery. Spurred on by this research an integrative psychotherapy framework has been developed to help promote metacognitive capacity for adults with psychosis . Referred to as Metacognitive Reflection and Insight Therapy or MERIT, this integrative approach is intended to provide clinicians with the skills to implement and evaluate their intervention. It’s ultimate goal is to assist patients to make personally meaningful sense of the challenges they face and decide how to actively manage those, ultimately enabling self-directive recovery. This presentation will present the key elements and research supporting MERIT and provide illustrations for treatment as well as methods for assessment.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  explain three ways that metacognitive deficits are barrier to recovery from psychosis
2.  describe one system for measuring metacognition within routine clinical contacts
3.  list eight core processes which can promote metacognitive capacity within psychotherapy sessions

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20th

7:45 - 8:00 Sponsor Messages

8:00 - 9:30 Presentation #9 Keynote Address

 
Presentation #9:  "After the vaccine:  Will we recognize ourselves in the mirror?" 
Morgan T. Sammons, Ph.D., ABPP


 
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
This keynote presentation will cover legal and regulatory challenges brought about by the COVID19 pandemic, and the short and long term consequences that are likely to change multiple aspects of the profession. The presenter will discuss legal, ethical and regulatory challenges associated with distance service provision, the effects of the pandemic on the future supply of psychologists, and applicable federal law and regulation that will change how psychologists practice in the future. Suggestions for how the profession might anticipate and adapt to these changes will be provided.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  identify challenges in providing distant psychological services to individuals of non-dominant ethnic and sexual backgrounds
2.  enumerate at least three significant challenges to the profession brought about by the coronavirus pandemic
3.  identify new federal and state laws and regulations designed to support the delivery of mental health services after the pandemic

 

9:30 - 9:45 Sponsor Messages & Break

9:45 - 11:15 Concurrent Presentations #10 & #11

 
Presentation #10:  "An Introduction to Adolescent Dialectical Behavior Therapy"
Melissa Butler, Ph.D., HSPP
 
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Participants will be given an introduction to Adolescent Dialectical Behavior Therapy, an evidenced-based treatment approach. Participants will learn how Adolescent DBT differs from Adult Standard DBT and how it can be particularly helpful for working with adolescents who engage in self-harm and suicidal behavior.  Participants will be introduced to the Adolescent DBT skills training modules and instructed on ways they can incorporate specific skills into their everyday clinical practice.  Participants will be given tips and suggestions on how to provide Adolescent DBT skills training in a virtual format. This presentation is meant as an introduction to Adolescent DBT and for those with minimal experience or training in adolescent DBT.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  summarize the main components of Adolescent DBT and state how it is the same and how it differs from Adult Standard DBT
2.  describe the five Adolescent Skills Training modules and a few specific skills from each
3.  describe specific ways they can incorporate Adolescent DBT skills into their own clinical practice
4.  summarize some of the strengths and limitations in using DBT skills training with culturally diverse groups
5.  identify strategies for offering Adolescent DBT Skills training virtually


Presentation #11:  "Giving Psychology Away: Why and How You Can Engage in Advocacy"
Amanda Zelechoski, J.D., Ph.D., ABPP

 
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Getting involved in advocacy and policy work often feels intimidating or risky for psychologists. "Where would I start?" "What if it becomes really “political?" "I don’t have time to march up the steps of Capitol Hill." But, engaging in advocacy takes many forms, big and small, and there are likely ways you are already doing it, without even knowing. Proactive and intentional efforts toward making psychology accessible to all are needed now more than ever. In the midst of a global pandemic and heightened racial and political tension, there are many ways we can use our knowledge and expertise to “give psychology away” and get it into the hands of those who need it most. This presentation will discuss a variety of ways we can each use our privilege, knowledge, and skills to empower others, combat misuse of psychological phenomena in the media, and work toward systemic change. Strategies will be presented for all levels, from students to the most seasoned psychologists, for how we can (and should) be ensuring that psychology is at the forefront of social justice. 

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:

1.  explain the importance of advocacy in the field of psychology
2.  identify several ways in which they can be involved in advocacy at different levels and in both the short- and long-term
3.  formulate an individual action plan for engaging in psychology-related advocacy
 

11:15 - 11:30 Sponsor Messages & Break

11:30 - 12:15 Annual Award Presentations

12:15 - 12:30 Sponsor Messages & Break

12:30 - 2:00 Concurrent Presentations #12 & #13
 
Presentation #12:  "PTSD at the End of Life"
Jeffrey D. Lightfoot, Ph.D., HSPP
(no image available)
 
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
This presentation provides an overview of PTSD and how it potentially alters a patient’s ability to engage with treatment and affects clinical approaches of clinicians at the end of life.  It describes a framework to provide patient-centered care to maximize care coordination and patient outcomes.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  recognize how trauma impacts Veterans at the end of life
2.  describe treatment options for PTSD specific to the end of life
3.  utilize Trauma Informed Care


Presentation #13: "The Interrelationship between Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Delirium, Depression, and Dementia"
Sophia Wang, M.D.

1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
About 6% of people diagnosed with coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) require intensive care unit (ICU) hospitalization for symptoms such as acute respiratory distress, hypoxia, shock, and multiorgan failure. Post-intensive care syndrome (PICS) describes the long-term cognitive, psychological and physical impairments following critical illness. About 50-70% of all ICU survivors experience at least one PICS-related impairment, and effects can persist for as long as 5-15 years after discharge. These symptoms can have a substantial impact on patient quality of life and caregiver burden. It has become an increasingly important phenomenon in older adults as survival rates from intensive care unit (ICU) hospitalizations have increased. In this talk, we will provide an overview of PICS, with an emphasis on symptoms of long-term cognitive impairment and psychiatric complications in older adults. Cognitive impairments after critical illness is observed across a range of cognitive domains including memory, attention and executive function, and can persist for years following critical illness. Depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder are prevalent in the ICU survivor population, and 4-6 times more common compared to the general population. We will review the risk factors for ICU-acquired cognitive impairment and mental health impairments associated with PICS. We will then discuss the importance of preventing, diagnosing and managing these symptoms, and the role of mental health professionals, including psychologists, in managing PICS. Finally, the presentation will conclude by discussing the potential implications for our society with the recent COVID-19 pandemic, and reviewing available interventions and future directions for improved comprehensive treatment of PICS.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  describe the long-term cognitive and mental health effects from critical illness
2.  describe the potential future directions and promising interventions for post-intensive care syndrome
3.  describe the implications of COVID-19 pandemic in terms of critical illness survivorship
4.  describe recent research findings about underrepresented groups in COVID-19 and PICS


2:00 - 2:15 Sponsor Messages & Break

2:15 - 3:45 Concurrent Presentations #14 & #15
 
Presentation #14:  "Suicide:  From Research to Practice"
Gili Goldfrad, Psy.D, HSPP & Julie T. Steck, Ph.D., HSPP
(Dr. Goldfrad's image is not available)

1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
The rate of suicide in the U.S. increased 33% from 1999 to 2017, with rates increasing more sharply after 2006.    In 2017 the rate of suicide was 14 suicides per 100,000 people.  Suicide is the second leading cause of death in individuals from 10 to 34 years of age.  While we won’t know the impact of the pandemic and current racial unrest on suicide for some time, the current stress in our society will likely drive suicide rates up. Psychologists are vigilant in assessing suicide risk in their patients. This presentation will address current research in the field of suicidality and bridge that knowledge to clinical practice. There will be a focus on the increased risk of suicide in marginalized populations and trends in suicide in minority groups.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  describe the current rates and trends in suicide in the U.S.
2.  identify the two necessary components of suicide in the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide and how they present in clinical practice
3.  recognize the increased risk of suicide in marginalized populations
4.  summarize the need for early diagnosis and intervention for mental illness and how this might decrease the rate of suicide in the U.S.
5.  describe the Suicide Prevention Program at the Veteran’s Administration and consider benefits of its application as a model for suicide prevention in the community


Presentation #15:  "Applied Ethics:  Using the CASES Approach to Resolve Ethical Dilemmas"
Shannon E. Woller, Psy.D., ABPP, HSPP

1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Psychologists encounter ethical dilemmas across the spectrum of professional activities.  These dilemmas create moral distress as well as liability risks and need to be handled with the highest level of ethical decision-making.  However, thinking through complex ethical issues is not an easy or natural process.  Psychologists, like all humans, are prone to many cognitive biases that occur in decision-making and which can have, in extreme cases, disastrous results.   Ethical decision-making is a skill that needs to be learned, practiced, honed, and supported throughout psychologists' careers.  As such, the purpose of this presentation is to introduce the new Ethics Consultation Service offered to Hoosier Psychologists through their IPA membership and review the CASES approach that the IPA’s Ethics Consultation Service will use to work through consultations.    The CASES approach to resolving ethical dilemmas was developed by the National Center for Ethics in Health Care.  The purpose of this presentation is to familiarize psychologists with tools to help clarify the values in conflict when ethical dilemmas are identified, to write meaningful ethics questions that clearly summarize the dilemmas, and to generate options for ethical resolution of the dilemmas.  To achieve these aims, the presentation will first review what constitutes an ethical dilemma, outline common values that come into conflict in psychology, and review the steps of the CASES approach for resolving dilemmas.  Case examples will be utilized to illustrate how the CASES approach is applied to ethical dilemmas.  Attendees will also learn how to access and utilize IPA’s Ethics Consultation Service.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  describe how to utilize IPA’s Ethics Consultation Service
2.  summarize the steps of the CASES approach
3.  describe what constitutes an ethical dilemma in psychology
 

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SPECIAL NOTE TO CONFERENCE ATTENDEES

The Indiana Psychological Association (IPA) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Indiana Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • Indiana State Psychology Board and Indiana Behavioral Health Board:  IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for psychologists. IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for LSW, LCSW, LMFT, LMHC, LMFTA, LCAC and LAC.
  • Licensees must judge the program's relevance to their professional practice.
Please note that APA rules require that credit be given only to those who attend the entire workshop(s). Those arriving more than 15 minutes after the scheduled start time or leaving early will not receive CE credits. Partial credit cannot be given. Attendance will be recorded via the webinar platform. 

Attendees will be responsible for answering the presentation evaluations for the presentations attended. IPA will e-mail a link with a survey evaluation for each presentation to each registered attendee on the day of the event.

All licensees requesting Category I CE credits will receive a certificate from IPA confirming the number of credits earned. These certificates will be delivered via email approximately 2-6 weeks after the conference.

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PRESENTER BIOGRAPHIES
Click here for link to 2020 IPA Fall Conference Presenter Biographies.
 
REGISTRATION

Registration ends Sunday, November 15th, 2020.

Cancellation/Refund Policy:
 IPA will provide refunds for registration cancellations made by Monday, November 9th, 2020 minus a $30 cancellation fee. No refunds will be given for cancellations fewer than 10 days before an event.

MEMBERS:  Members must login (through Registration link) to receive the Members discount.
$220 IPA BASIC, EMERITUS - RETIRED, ACADEMIC Members
$180 IPA PREMIER, NEW, EMERITUS - PRACTICING Members
$0 IPA STUDENT Members - new $0 charge for 2020
$0 IPA PLATINUM Members

NON-MEMBERS
$275 Psychologists & Other Professionals
$0 Students - new $0 charge for 2020

Note to Non-Members:  Non-Members may apply to join and, upon acceptance, we will credit your account for the difference in the Fall Conference rate, effectively reducing your 2020 conference cost by $95. We will also begin your membership immediately so you will benefit from membership for the remainder of 2020!

Submit membership application online for membership in October or November. Contact the IPA office for details at (317)257-7449 or contact Connie Vore at admin@indianapsychology.org.

Note to Presenters: Presenters will receive a discount code via e-mail that can be applied during registration. Contact the IPA office for details at (317)257-7449 or contact Connie Vore at admin@indianapsychology.org.

 
SPONSORS/EXHIBITORS 
If you are interested in exhibiting at the Conference, contact info@indianapsychology.org.
 
Please contact info@indianapsychology.org or admin@indianapsychology.org if you have additional questions.

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Event Date:11/19/2020 - 11/20/2020
Event Time:7:45 AM - 4:30 PM Eastern
Location:Live Webinars
UNITED STATES
Contact Person:Connie Vore, Director of Operations, IPA
(phone: 3172577449)
Event Registration:
Outlook/vCalendar/Google:Click on the icon next to the date(s) to add to your calendar:
11/19/2020 - 11/20/2020
Email Reminder:click here to setup an email reminder for this event


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