Indiana Psychological Association - Event Information


Event Name:2021 IPA VIRTUAL Fall Conference
Event Type(s):CE Events
Description:
2021 IPA VIRTUAL Fall Conference
Thursday, November 18th and Friday, November 19th, 2021
8:00 a.m. - 4:40 p.m. ET Thursday
8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. ET Friday


IPA is proud to announce that the 2021 IPA Fall Conference will be 100% virtual.


Join us for our high quality lineup, presented over two days, offering 12 Category I Continuing Education 90-minute presentations via live webinars. Attendees can earn up to 12.0 CE hours for live presentations
(6.0 hours on Thursday, 6.0 hours on Friday).

All registered will be eligible to earn homestudy credit, at no additional cost, for the presentations they are not able to attend live, so all are eligible to receive up to 18 Category I CE hours upon registering for this event.

Registered attendees will receive the webinar links and passwords for each presentation and the presentation slide sets via e-mail approximately one-two weeks prior to the conference.

The 2021 IPA Student Abstract Competition will also take place virtually. Student poster presenters will be sharing a short video describing their poster. IPA will compile these videos and offer a Student Poster Presentation session on Thursday at 11:40 a.m.

The IPA Annual Awards will be presented virtually during the Annual Awards Presentations session on Friday at 11:30 a.m.

Registration ends Tuesday, November 16th, 2020.

 
QUICK LINKS:
Conference Schedule
Thursday, November 18th
Friday, November 19th
Special Note to Conference Attendees

Presenter Biographies
Registration Details/Cost-- Register button at very bottom of this page
Sponsors/Exhibitors

 
CONFERENCE SCHEDULE
Thursday, November 18th Friday, November 19th
7:45 - 8:00 Sponsor Messages 7:45 - 8:00 Sponsor Messages
8:00 - 8:10 Welcome/Kickoff
8:10 - 9:40 Concurrent Presentations #1 & #2
Presentation #1:  "Black Women and 2020: The Effects of Covid19 and Social Injustice on Physical and Mental Health"
Sharon L. Bowman, PhD, HSPP, ABPP; Rosalyn Davis, PhD, HSPP; & Shantel D. Gaillard, MA, MPH

Presentation #2:  "Applied Ethics:  Trending Topics in Ethical Decision-Making"
Stephanie J. Cunningham, Ph.D., HSPP; Mary J. Schwendener , Ph.D, HSPP, ABPP, MDiv; & Shannon Woller, Psy.D., ABPP, HSPP
8:00 - 9:30 Presentation #9 
Presentation #9:  "Supervising Diversity Challenges Experienced by Remote Practicing Clinicians"
Lauren M. Cunningham, PhD, HSPP
9:40 - 9:55 Sponsor Messages & Break 9:30 - 9:45 Sponsor Messages & Break
9:55 - 11:25 Concurrent Presentations #3 & #4
Presentation #3:  "Coping with Pediatric Chronic Medical and Pain Conditions"
Elaine Gilbert, PsyD, HSPP

Presentation #4:  "Somatoform Disorders in Adults: Conceptualization, Evaluation, & Treatment"
Courtney Johnson, PhD, HSPP, ABPP-CN
9:45 - 11:15 Presentations #10
Presentation #10:  "Pediatric Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures" 
Garry Wright, PhD, HSPP

 
11:25 - 11:40 Sponsor Messages & Break 11:15 - 11:30 Sponsor Messages & Break
11:40 - 1:10 Student Poster Presentations 11:30 - 12:30 Annual Award Presentations
1:10 - 1:25 Sponsor Messages & Break 12:30 - 12:45 Sponsor Messages & Break
1:25 - 2:55 Concurrent Presentations #5 & #6
Presentation #5:  "Integrating Psychology within Pediatric Medical Care: Implications for High-Risk Asthma, Weight Management, and Sickle Cell Disease"
Julia LaMotte, PhD, HSPP; Maureen E. McQuillan, PhD, HSPP; & Katherine Schwartzkopf, PsyD, HSPP

Presentation #6:  "An Ethical Model to Mentorship within Subspecialty Areas of Psychology" by Ryan D. Greene, PsyD
12:45 - 2:15 Presentation #11
Presentation #11:  "A Neurodevelopmental Approach to Culturally Competent Assessment of ADHD"
Elizabeth Akey, PhD & Will Anastasiadis, MS


 
2:55 - 3:10 Sponsor Messages & Break 2:15 - 2:30 Sponsor Messages & Break
3:10 - 4:40 Concurrent Presentations #7 & #8
Presentation #7:  "A Review of Neurobiological Pathways to Emotional and Behavioral Problems Following Childhood Maltreatment"
Joseph Aloi, MD, PhD & Kathleen I. Crum, PhD, HSPP

Presentation #8:  "Early Interventions for Infidelity Treatment"
Raymond (Butch) Losey, Ed.D.,LPCC-S
2:30 - 4:00 Presentation #12
Presentation #12:  “Extending the Implications of American Identity, Nationalism, and Patriotism: Applications for Research and Practice"
Noelany Pelc, PhD

 
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18th

7:45 - 8:00 Sponsor Messages

8:00 - 8:10 Welcome & Kickoff

8:10 - 9:40 Concurrent Presentations #1 & #2

 
Presentation #1:  "Black Women and 2020: The Effects of Covid19 and Social Injustice on Physical and Mental Health" 
Sharon L. Bowman, PhD, HSPP, ABPP; Rosalyn Davis, PhD, HSPP; & Shantel D. Gaillard, MA, MPH



1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
The events of 2020 and 2021 have taken their toll. For some, Covid19 and responses to it have been the primary stressor in their lives. For others, the stress stems from social injustice and the subsequent disruption in the fabric of America. Black women may worry about the ability of their male relatives to survive an incident with law enforcement. Black men were 2.5 times more likely than white men, and Black women 1.4 times more likely than white women, to be killed by police (Edwards et al., 2019). African American women also worry about their own health, and distrust the medical community, for good reason - although more men than women have died from Covid19, significantly more Black women have died than have White men (Rushovich et al., 2021). Thus, all things considered, it is not surprising that structural and systemic racism are THE biggest health issue for Black women.  The combined stressors of the- ongoing pandemic and the renewed attacks on social justice work under the guise of movements to ban critical race theory present another unnecessary burden on the health and well-being of Black women in their personal and professional lives.

The goal of this presentation is to discuss the data on Black women and stress related to Covid and social injustice, followed by steps psychologists might use to address these stressors for their clients, colleagues and students.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  list at least three factors affecting Black women's health during the 2020 syndemic.
2.  identify at least two therapeutic techniques that address Black women's health-related stress.
3.  describe at least two techniques to assist Black women colleagues experiencing syndemic-related stress.
 


Presentation #2:  "Applied Ethics:  Trending Topics in Ethical Decision-Making"
Stephanie J. Cunningham, Ph.D., HSPP; Mary J. Schwendener , Ph.D, HSPP, ABPP, MDiv; & Shannon Woller, Psy.D., ABPP, HSPP


1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Psychologists encounter ethical dilemmas across the spectrum of professional activities. These dilemmas create moral distress as well as liability risks and need to be handled with the highest level of ethical decision-making. Ethical decision-making is a skill that needs to be learned, practiced, honed, and supported throughout psychologists' careers.  Recent events have brought into clear focus how important it is to focus on ethics in the changing landscape of professional practice, to consider the intersectionality of ethics and multicultural practice, and to acknowledge and act upon the critical mandate for self-care. The purpose of this presentation is to familiarize psychologists with Indiana Psychological Association’s Ethics Consultation Committee and the CASES approach the committee uses to address ethical concerns.  Additionally, this presentation will address on three trending topics in ethics:  how to use the CASES approach to resolve ethical dilemmas when resources are not able to meet the demand for service, how the CASES approach can help approach the intersection of multicultural practice and ethical practice, and how to practically apply the ethical mandate for self-care.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to: 
1.  describe how to utilize IPA's Ethics Consultation Service.
2.  summarize the steps of the CASES approach.
3.  describe the values in conflict when resources are limited.
4.  describe how ethics inform multicultural practice.
5.  identify 2 ways to engage in self-care regularly in real-world settings.

9:40 - 9:55 Sponsor Messages & Break

9:55 - 11:25 Concurrent Presentations #3 & #4

 
Presentation #3:  "Coping with Pediatric Chronic Medical and Pain Conditions"
Elaine Gilbert, PsyD, HSPP

1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
As the number of adolescents living with chronic medical conditions and pain has increased, psychologists are striving to develop comprehensive treatment modalities to meet the unique needs of this population. These children and adolescents experience major disruptions in developmental tasks including academic, social, and vocational functionality, which often is associated with familial distress as well as disruptions in relationships, communication, and cohesion (Carter & Threlkeld, 2012). Modifications of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy interventions geared toward improved functionality have been found effective in decreasing symptomology and increasing adherence (Velleman et al., 2010). Specifically, the Children's Health and Illness Recovery Program (CHIRP; Carter let al., 2019) has been found to be an effective modality in reducing pain, fatigue, and functional disability in adolescents while improving familial communication and quality of relationships. This presentation would propose to discuss treatment strategies for this unique population.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  utilize knowledge of pain to inform treatment of patients and families. 
2.  apply effective clinical interventions for treatment of chronic medical conditions and pain
3.  discuss applications and resources to aid in treatment of patients with chronic medical conditions or chronic pain.


Presentation #4: "Somatoform Disorders in Adults: Conceptualization, Evaluation, & Treatment"
​Courtney Johnson, PhD, HSPP, ABPP-CN

1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
The aim of this presentation is to equip providers who see adults with somatoform disorders in evaluative or treatment contexts. Starting with a solid conceptualization helps to inform the assessment and treatment process for psychological conditions, and this is particularly true for somatoform conditions. The goal for an attendee of this presentation is threefold: 1) to be more likely to recognize somatoform disorders when part of the clinical picture, 2) to know more about how to effectively assess for somatoform disorders in a clinic screening and more in-depth assessment context, and 2) to better understand how to tailor evidence-based treatment for these individuals with consideration to cultural and contextual variables. Psychologists can serve an integral role in the overall management and treatment of adults with somatoform conditions. 

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  summarize the relationship between somatoform disorders and the concept of self-deception.
2.  identify the conceptual difference between somatoform disorders and malingering and differences in assessment findings for each.
3.  describe how the current evidence base of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be tailored for individualized treatment for adults with somatoform disorders with consideration of cultural and contextual factors.

 
11:25 - 11:40 Sponsor Messages & Break

11:40 - 1:10 Student Poster Presentations

1:10 - 1:25 Sponsor Messages & Break

1:25 - 2:55 Concurrent Presentations #5 & #6

 
Presentation #5:  "Integrating Psychology within Pediatric Medical Care: Implications for High-Risk Asthma, Weight Management, and Sickle Cell Disease" by Julia LaMotte, PhD, HSPP; Maureen E. McQuillan, PhD, HSPP; & Katherine Schwartzkopf, PsyD, HSPP

1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Difficult to control asthma, pediatric obesity, and sickle cell disease are multifactorial problems with numerous contributory factors, including limited access to financial and social resources, as well as psychosocial stressors that can affect treatment adherence and healthcare engagement. Although these contributory factors have been well established, only a limited number of children’s hospitals have established multidisciplinary care within these disease groups (severe pediatric asthma, pediatric weight management, and sickle cell disease), to comprehensively address the aforementioned risk factors and optimize treatment care and outcomes through a holistic, collaborative model. Within the realm of pediatric health, there are known disparities in access and utilization of mental health services especially for diverse or underrepresented populations. For Latinx and Black communities, negative biases and mental health stigma have perpetuated barriers to accessing care. Embedding pediatric psychologists into medical care can address mental health disparities for populations who have been historically underserved, which is modeled across these three disease groups.

This presentation summarizes our institution’s allied health approach to managing difficult to control pediatric asthma, treating pediatric obesity, and addressing the psychosocial impact of sickle cell disease with particular emphasis on the role of psychology in targeting adherence, treatment engagement, comorbid mental health symptoms, and additional lifestyle risk factors.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  identify background on pediatric asthma, obesity, and sickle cell disease and implications of social determinants of health on disease outcomes.
2.  describe the role of Pediatric Psychology and multidisciplinary care within medical settings.
3.  list key motivational interviewing techniques to promote improved adherence for managing pediatric chronic illnesses.
4.  describe brief, evidence-based interventions to address comorbid mental health concerns in multidisciplinary settings.


Presentation #6:  "An Ethical Model to Mentorship within Subspecialty Areas of Psychology"
Ryan D. Greene, PsyD

1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
This presentation will propose a research-informed model on the training and mentoring predoctoral students, fellows, and early-career psychologists as they explore subspecialty foci, including neuropsychology, geropsychology, polytrauma/rehab psychology, etc. Rather than focusing on a specific subfield, this talk will instead explore both the ethics and practical steps involved in guiding mentees toward their areas of passion.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  define specific ethical principles that should be considered in the mentoring relationship.
2.  discuss practical steps of establishing optimal mentorship relationships for mentees pursuing subspecialty training.
3.  identify positive implications of good mentorship and negative implications of poor mentorship.

 

2:55 - 3:10 Sponsor Messages & Break

3:10 - 4:40 Concurrent Presentations #7 & #8

 
Presentation #7: "A Review of Neurobiological Pathways to Emotional and Behavioral Problems Following Childhood Maltreatment"
Joseph Aloi, MD, PhD and Kathleen I. Crum, PhD, HSPP
 
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
A growing body of literature suggests that early life stress—including exposure to childhood maltreatment—has far-reaching impacts on the developing brain. Childhood abuse and neglect are uniquely associated with brain-level anatomical and functional differences that may contribute to psychopathology. The proposed oral presentation will review the recent literature on the neurobiology of pediatric traumatic stress. Specific attention will be paid to neural pathways from childhood abuse and neglect to increased risk for emotional and behavioral problems. Existing literature suggests the importance of considering neurobiological correlates of childhood maltreatment in assessment and treatment. Clinical implications of the literature will be discussed.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  identify neurobiological correlates of childhood maltreatment exposure.
2.  describe potential neurobiological pathways by which childhood maltreatment may affect psychopathology.
3.  list potential risk and protective factors that may influence the association between childhood maltreatment and psychopathology.


Presentation #8:  "Early Interventions for Infidelity Treatment"
Raymond (Butch) Losey, Ed.D.,LPCC-S
 
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Betrayed partners want the "truth" about their partner's infidelity and seek out many ways to get it, such as contacting the affair partner, personally investigating and tracking their partner's whereabouts, interviewing others, and insisting on the use of a polygraph test. Betraying partners may lie about their behaviors due to embarrassment or as an attempt to limit damage. It can be overwhelming for the clinician to manage the multiple crisis during infidelity recovery. This workshop will offer helpful guidance that clinicians can use to address multiple issues, including how to assist the betraying partner in disclosing their affair to their partner, managing revenge fantasies of the betrayed partner, engaging the couple in discussions about the challenges of contacting the affair partner and other individuals, and the dangers in using a polygraph as part of therapeutic process.


Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  identify a process for guiding couples through the disclosure of infidelity.
2.  describe the risks associated with contacting the affair partner to obtain information and challenges with discussing the affair with friends and family.
3.  identify the function of revenge fantasies and how to manage them in session.
4.  list the professional and ethical concerns for recommending or including polygraphs in treatment.
5.  describe the characteristics of a trusting relationship and trust-building behaviors that can be implemented immediately by the couple.

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19th

7:45 - 8:00 Sponsor Messages

8:00 - 9:30 Presentation #9 

 
Presentation #9:  "Supervising Diversity Challenges Experienced by Remote Practicing Clinicians"
Lauren M. Cunningham, PhD, HSPP
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Psychologists encounter various challenges while providing supervision to remote practicing clinicians.  In light of both COVID-19 and the growing popularity of companies offering teletherapy services, the need to ensure awareness of evidenced-based supervision in a remote environment is essential. With that being said, ongoing racist narratives and behaviors continue to draw light to the need for supervisors to assist clinicians who encounter racism, white privilege, and microaggressions in the therapy digital room.  This presentation will focus on the ways by which supervisors can acknowledge, address, and support clinicians who encounter diversity challenges while providing teletherapy.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  describe the challenges facing supervisors providing telesupervision.
2.  summarize components of effective supervision related to diversity factors.
3.  apply various supervision models to explore diversity challenges experienced by remote practicing clinicians.

9:30 - 9:45 Sponsor Messages & Break

9:45 - 11:15 Presentation #10

 
Presentation #10:  "Pediatric Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures" 
Garry Wright, PhD, HSPP
 
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are paroxysmal events that resemble epileptic seizures but are not caused by abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Rather, these episodes are conceptualized as having an underlying psychological or emotional cause that lead to sensory and motor symptoms. Diagnosis of PNES is often complicated by the presence of comorbid psychiatric disorders and neurological conditions, including epilepsy. Misdiagnosis may result in unnecessary invasive procedures and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that have potential cognitive and psychiatric side effects. While treatment approaches have been described in the literature, evidence-based practices have not yet been established. This webinar will aim to increase understanding of the clinical features of pediatric PNES, discuss important considerations when evaluating neuropsychological functions of youths with suspected or confirmed PNES, and summarize emerging treatment approaches.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  describe the DSM-5 somatic symptom and related disorders.
2.  discuss clinical features of pediatric psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.
3.  identify risk factors and co-occurring conditions.
4.  discuss assessment considerations when evaluating youths with suspected or confirmed PNES.
5.  describe emerging treatment approaches for pediatric PNES.


 
11:15 - 11:30 Sponsor Messages & Break

11:30 - 12:30 Annual Award Presentations

12:30 - 12:45 Sponsor Messages & Break

12:45 - 2:15 Presentation #11

 
Presentation #11:  "A Neurodevelopmental Approach to Culturally Competent Assessment of ADHD"
Elizabeth Akey, PhD & Will Anastasiadis, MS
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairing symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention that is frequently diagnosed in youth and young adults. Misdiagnosis and undertreatment of ADHD are serious burdens for younger patients at risk, as the absence of preventative treatment may ensue long-lasting effects into adulthood. Recent advancements in the ADHD literature have optimized our understanding of evaluation and intervention. This presentation will highlight some of the current research on etiology, multimodal assessment, and evidence-based treatment (EBT) in youth and young adults with ADHD (i.e., ages 3-25), with particular emphasis on cultural competence in professional practice and neurobehavioral correlates resulting in ADHD pathogenesis. 

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  identify at least two biopsychosocial correlates regarding ADHD pathogenesis identified in recent research literature. 
2.  summarize treatment and assessment considerations in at least one of the following patient populations: (1) early childhood (preschool and school-aged), (2) adolescence, or (3) young adulthood.
3.  analyze at least two aspects of current theoretical and empirical knowledge regarding how elements of diversity interact with the assessment and treatment of individuals diagnosed with ADHD. 
4.  formulate at least one step participants can take to integrate and apply their increased empirical knowledge of ADHD to their clinical practice and other professional roles.
 

2:15 - 2:30 Sponsor Messages & Break

2:30 - 4:00 Presentation #12

 
Presentation #12:  “Extending the Implications of American Identity, Nationalism, and Patriotism: Applications for Research and Practice"
​Noelany Pelc, PhD
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
In its comparably short history, the United States has generated a strong national identity that alternatively engenders pride and exclusivity. For example, the 2016 and 2020 elections were punctuated with anti-immigration sentiments rooted in xenophobic, racist, and pro-authoritarian views (Bergen, 2016). Although there is scholarship on the nature of nationalism, patriotism, in-group and out-group identification, and more recently, American identity (Manevska & Achternberg, 2010), little research within the field of counseling has explored the complex characterization of inclusion in American identity.

While counseling and psychology have been leaders in the multicultural movement, national identity has sparsely been addressed in the literature. Clinicians are tasked with conceptualizing how individuals integrate multiple cultural identities within the U.S. across the lifespan, experience Americanness as protective or exclusionary, and manage acculturative stress. This program informs the understanding of out-group derogation and inclusion/exclusion through quantitative and narrative findings. Specifically, this program will explore the ways in which clinicians, supervisors, and educators can engage in social advocacy and view clients through a cultural lens (Sehghal et al., 2011) through discussion, case studies, and personal reflection. Participants will be encouraged to seek parallels with the culturally complex context of the state of Indiana and broader national context.
 

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  analyze lesser-discussed cultural identities to include national identity and its relationship to the perception of immigrants or perceived outsiders.
2.  examine and conceptualize the ways in which American Identity is often defined within the United States as a protective or exclusionary identity variable. 
3.  discuss at least 3 ways in which national identity, intergroup conflict and internalized messages intersect within clinical, supervisory, and educational settings.

 
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SPECIAL NOTE TO CONFERENCE ATTENDEES

The Indiana Psychological Association (IPA) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Indiana Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • Indiana State Psychology Board and Indiana Behavioral Health Board:  IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for psychologists. IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for LSW, LCSW, LMFT, LMHC, LMFTA, LCAC and LAC.
  • Licensees must judge the program's relevance to their professional practice.
Please note that APA rules require that credit be given only to those who attend the entire workshop(s). Those arriving more than 15 minutes after the scheduled start time or leaving early will not receive CE credits. Partial credit cannot be given. Attendance will be recorded via the webinar platform. 

Attendees will be responsible for answering the presentation evaluations for the presentations attended. IPA will e-mail a link with a survey evaluation for each presentation to each registered attendee on the day of the event.

All licensees requesting Category I CE credits will receive a certificate from IPA confirming the number of credits earned for each session. These certificates will be delivered via email approximately 2-6 weeks after the conference. IPA will not produce any kind of "attendance" certificate for students.

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PRESENTER BIOGRAPHIES
Click here for link to 2021 IPA Fall Conference Presenter Biographies.

 
REGISTRATION

Registration ends Tuesday, November 16th, 2021.

IF REGISTERING FOR SOMEONE ELSE, please only register one person per transaction and use the attendee's email address. All correspondence must go to the attendee. 
Contact Connie Vore at admin@indianapsychology.org if you have any questions or need any assistance. 

Cancellation/Refund Policy: IPA will not provide refunds for registration cancellations since all registrants can obtain Category I CE credit for all 12 sessions via IPA's Homestudy program. Contact info@indianapsychology.org if you have any questions.

MEMBERS:  Members must login (through Registration link) to receive the Members discount.
$220 IPA BASIC, EMERITUS - RETIRED, ACADEMIC Members
$180 IPA PREMIER, NEW, EMERITUS - PRACTICING Members
$0 IPA STUDENT Members 
$0 IPA PLATINUM Members

NON-MEMBERS
$275 Psychologists & Other Professionals
STUDENT Poster Presenters who are not yet IPA members - register as a Non-IPA Member, then use the Discount Code shared with you via the Abstract Submission confirmation (or contact admin@indianapsychology.org) to attend at $0 charge.
*If a non-member Student seeking to attend, please either join IPA (free membership with "sponsorship" by an IPA Academic Member or, if outside the state of Indiana, please contact info@indianapsychology.org.

Note to Non-Members:  Non-Members may apply to join and, upon acceptance, we will credit your account for the difference in the Fall Conference rate, effectively reducing your 2021 conference cost by $95. We will also begin your membership immediately so you will benefit from membership for the remainder of 2021!

Submit membership application online for membership. Contact the IPA office for details at (317)257-7449 or contact Connie Vore at admin@indianapsychology.org.

Note to Presenters: Presenters will receive a discount code via e-mail that can be applied during registration. Contact the IPA office for details at (317)257-7449 or contact Connie Vore at admin@indianapsychology.org.

 
SPONSORS/EXHIBITORS 
If you are interested in exhibiting at the Conference, contact info@indianapsychology.org.

 
Please contact info@indianapsychology.org or admin@indianapsychology.org if you have additional questions.

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Event Date:11/18/2021 - 11/19/2021
Event Time:7:45 AM - 4:45 PM Eastern
Location:Live Webinars
UNITED STATES
Contact Person:Connie Vore, Director of Operations, IPA
(phone: 3172577449)
Event Registration:
Outlook/vCalendar/Google:Click on the icon next to the date(s) to add to your calendar:
11/18/2021 - 11/19/2021
Email Reminder:click here to setup an email reminder for this event


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