2022 IPA VIRTUAL Fall Conference
Date/Time
11/10/2022 - 11/11/2022
7:45 AM - 3:00 PM Eastern
Event Registration
Event Type(s)
CE Events
Event Description
2022 IPA VIRTUAL Fall Conference
Thursday, November 10th and Friday, November 11th, 2022
8:00 a.m. - 3:00 pm ET Thursday
8:00 a.m. - 2:30 pm ET Friday


IPA is proud to announce that the 2022 IPA Fall Conference will be 100% virtual.

Join us for our high quality lineup, presented over two days, offering 13 Category I Continuing Education 90-minute presentations via live webinars. Attendees can earn up to 12.0 CE hours for live presentations
(6.0 hours on Thursday, 6.0 hours on Friday).

All registered will be eligible to earn homestudy credit, at no additional cost, for the presentations they are not able to attend live,
so all are eligible to receive up to 19.5 Category I CE hours upon registering for this event.

Registered attendees will receive the webinar links and passwords for each presentation and the presentation slide sets via e-mail in the week prior to the conference.

The IPA Annual Awards will be presented virtually during the Annual Awards Presentations session on Friday at 11:40 am ET.

Registration ends Wednesday, November 9th, 2022 at noon.


QUICK LINKS:
Conference Schedule
Thursday, November 10th
Friday, November 11th
Presenter Biographies
Special Note to Conference Attendees

Registration Details/Cost-- Register button at very bottom of this page when open
Sponsors/Exhibitors

 
CONFERENCE SCHEDULE
Thursday, November 10th Friday, November 11th
7:45 - 8:00 Sponsor Messages 7:45 - 8:00 Sponsor Messages
8:00 - 9:30 Concurrent Presentations #1 & #2
Presentation #1:  "The Role of Psychologists in Addressing the Needs of Young Children in Foster Care"
Elesia Hines, PsyD, HSPP, ECMH-E®, PMH-C 
Sarah Brown, PsyD, HSPP


Presentation #2:  "Ethical Considerations of Health Literacy"
Elaine Gilbert, PsyD HSPP
Katherine Schwartzkopf, PsyD, HSPP
Scott Wagoner PhD, HSPP
8:00 - 9:30 Concurrent Presentations #8 & #9
Presentation #8:  "Healing the Whole Person"
Jim Schroeder, PhD, HSPP

Presentation #9:  "Adapting Evidence-Based Practices for Gender Diverse Youth in Outpatient Mental Health Settings"
Melissa K Hord, PhD, HSPP
Amanda V Broderick, PhD, HSPP
9:30 - 9:50 Sponsor Messages & Break 9:30 - 9:50 Sponsor Messages & Break
9:50 - 11:20 Featured National Speaker Presentation
Presentation #3:  "Starving Brains are Driving the Mental Health Crisis"
Bonnie J. Kaplan, PhD

 
9:50 - 11:20 Concurrent Presentations #10 & #11
Presentation #10:  "Assessment of Psychosis Through the Lifetime" 
Bethany L. Leonhardt, PsyD, HSPP
Jacqueline Abate, PsyD, HSPP


Presentation #11:  "Dismantling Ableism through Neurodivergent Diagnosis Delivery"
Susan M. Wilczynski, PhD, BCBA-D
11:20 - 11:40 Sponsor Messages & Break 11:20 - 11:40 Sponsor Messages & Break
11:40- 1:10 Concurrent Presentations #4 & #5
Presentation #4:  "Validity and Effort in Pediatric Assessment"
Garry Wright, PhD, HSPP

Presentation #5:  "Special Topics in Couples & Sex Therapy: Couples Therapy with LGBTQ+ Populations, Working with Polyamory, and Addressing Out-of-Control Sexual Behavior"
Maria P. Hanzlik, PsyD, HSPP
Erin Weaver, PsyD, HSPP
Abby Bastnagel, PhD
11:40 - 12:40 Annual Award Presentations
1:10 - 1:30 Sponsor Messages & Break 12:40 - 1:00 Sponsor Messages & Break
1:30 - 3:00 Concurrent Presentations #6 & #7
Presentation #6:  "Examining Dehumanization, Outgroups and Fear: Advocacy and Applications in Practice"
Noelany Pelc, PhD

Presentation #7:  "Clinical Supervision of Psychotherapy for Serious Mental Illness: A Meaning-Making Approach"
Jay Hamm, PsyD, HSPP
1:00 - 2:30 Concurrent Presentations #12 & #13
Presentation #12:  "Empirically-Supported Clinical Practice in Specialty Areas: The Quick-Start Guide to Fostering Multicultural Competency "
Stephanie J. Cunningham, PhD, HSPP
Danielle Henderson, PhD, HSPP
Patrick Murphy, MSEd
Michelle K. Williams, BS


Presentation #13:  "Addressing Myths and Implementation Barriers of Exposure Therapy in OCD and Anxiety"
Heather M. Plinovich, PhD, HSPP



 


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10th

7:45 - 8:00 Sponsor Messages

8:00 - 9:30 Concurrent Presentations #1 & #2

Presentation #1:  "The Role of Psychologists in Addressing the Needs of Young Children in Foster Care"
Elesia Hines, PsyD, HSPP, ECMH-E®, PMH-C 
Sarah Brown, PsyD, HSPP


1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
This presentation will focus on the unique needs of young children (ages 0-5 years) and their families who are involved in the child welfare system. About 41% of children in foster care in Indiana are between the ages of 0-5 years. These children are more likely to have physical, developmental, behavioral and mental health problems. Unmet needs and gaps in care are more prominent in poor communities, rural areas, and/or communities of color which often have disparate social determinants of health. Assessment and intervention with this population may include addressing attachment relationships, trauma, development, and the needs of the child's caregivers. An overview of infant and early childhood mental health considerations will be provided as well as a review of evidence-based interventions for young children and families who are in need trauma, behavioral, and developmental supports. The importance of reflective practice and supervision/consultation while doing this work will be highlighted, as well as opportunities to increase awareness of personal biases that may impact our work with this population.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  summarize the unique needs of young children and their families who are involved in the child welfare system.
2.  list appropriate assessment and evidence-based strategies for this population. 
3.  describe how implicit biases regarding race, culture, and parenting practices impact psychologists' clinical work and therapeutic relationships with families. 



Presentation #2:  "Ethical Considerations of Health Literacy"
Elaine Gilbert, PsyD HSPP
Katherine Schwartzkopf, PsyD, HSPP
Scott Wagoner PhD, HSPP


1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Health literacy is defined as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions." Assessing and measuring health literacy is still an ongoing endeavor, but numerous factors  can impact the strength of literacy. Factors include; age, primary language, reading ability, attention span, etc. Psychologists have an ethical responsibility to ensure patients and families understand their own health and treatment. Thus, this presentation summarizes the multi-factorial components of health literacy and strategies on strengthening literacy with the patients and families psychologists serve.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to: 
1.   describe organizational and personal health literacy.   
2.   identify strategies to help promote health literacy.
3.   describe ways one can incorporate techniques into clinical practice.


 
9:30 - 9:50 Sponsor Messages & Break

9:50 - 11:20 Featured National Speaker, Presentation #3

Presentation #3:  "Starving Brains are Driving the Mental Health Crisis"
Bonnie J. Kaplan, PhD


1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
This presentation will cover several aspects of the research on nutrition and mental health, including why our brains are not getting sufficient nutrients, and how this deficiency results in mental health challenges. Causes of inadequate nutrient consumptions include poor food choices (as shown in the latest data from the US Government NHANES analyses), reduced nutrient density of crops, demineralization of the soil in part caused by herbicides and pesticides. Proof of relevance for mental health that will be reviewed include four types of data proving that suboptimal nutrition is an important contributor to mental disorders: correlational, prospective longitudinal, treatment with whole of diet, and treatment with micronutrients. In the treatment area, both placebo-controlled randomized trials will be reviewed as well as other sound methodological designs. An important aspect of this presentation will be to explain that lifestyle variables are within the scope of practice for mental health clinicians. Another important aspect will be demystifying the types of information required for a non-dietitian to assist their clients in taking a giant leap toward better brain health.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  describe why nutrients are an important part of brain health.
2.  identify at least three types of data that demonstrate nutritional prevention and treatment of mental disorders.
3.  utilize nutrition education in their clinical work.

 
11:20 - 11:40 Sponsor Messages & Break

11:40 - 1:10 Concurrent Presentations #4 & #5

 
Presentation #4:  "Validity and Effort in Pediatric Assessment"
Garry Wright, PhD, HSPP


1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
The use of performance validity tests (PVTs) has been recognized as an essential component in adult neuropsychological evaluations, and more recently, when assessing children and adolescents. The American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN) and the National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN) recommend the use of effort measures and validity indicators as part of neuropsychological evaluations. Research has shown that children as young as six years old can engage in deception and purposefully under-perform on neurocognitive measures. Youths may feign cognitive problems and/or give noncredible effort for a variety of reasons, including gaining parental attention, access to stimulant medication and school accommodations, avoiding chores or schoolwork, poor engagement with testing, and noncompliance. Undetected inadequate effort during testing threatens the examiner's ability to understand a child's strengths and weaknesses and risks inaccurate diagnoses and inappropriate recommendations. This presentation will provide a review of standalone and embedded pediatric PVTs, discuss the use of PVTs with various clinical groups, review how to document PVTs in reports, and consider approaches in discussing suboptimal performance with children and their families.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  list available standalone PVTs and embedded effort measures, as well as their psychometric strengths and weaknesses for a variety of clinical groups.
2.  describe reasons why children and adolescent may display noncredible effort on testing.
3.  describe several approaches to discussing suboptimal performance with youths and/or their caregivers during a neuropsychological evaluation.

 
 
Presentation #5:  "Special Topics in Couples & Sex Therapy: Couples Therapy with LGBTQ+ Populations, Working with Polyamory, and Addressing Out-of-Control Sexual Behavior"
Maria P. Hanzlik, PsyD, HSPP
Erin Weaver, PsyD, HSPP
Abby Bastnagel, PhD


1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
There are a number of empirically-supported couples therapy modalities that provide important guidelines for how to conduct couples therapy. Despite couples therapy training, clinicians can find it challenging to navigate how to apply theoretical frameworks and interventions to specific patient populations or presentations. Even more challenging still is the ability to successfully integrate addressing and treating problematic sexual concerns and dynamics within the context of relationship therapy. In this workshop, presenters will discuss treating LGBTQ+ couples, working with polyamory in relationship therapy, and exploring what has been termed "sex addiction" or "out-of-control sexual behavior" by addressing the literature, providing specific intervention recommendations, and discussing case examples for each of the three special topic areas.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  identify 3 strategies for navigating non-monogamous relationships.
2.  identify 2 treatment considerations when working with LGBTQ+ couples.
3.  identify 2 alternative models for conceptualizing and treating sex addiction.
 

1:10 - 1:30 Sponsor Messages & Break

1:30 - 3:00 Concurrent Presentations #6 & #7

 
Presentation #6:  "Examining Dehumanization, Outgroups and Fear:  Advocacy and Applications in Practice"
Noelany Pelc, PhD

1.5 Category I CE


Program Description:
Narratives surrounding cultural contamination of dominant White culture within the United States revolve around the perception that the very essence of American identity is at risk of becoming diluted, polluted, or fouled (Brown, 2013; Newman et al., 2012). Historically, immigrants and outgroups have been linked to concepts of disease or contamination, and images associated with vermin (Green et al., 2010). Although disgust, fear and threat are natural and largely unlearned responses to stimuli and objects, they can also be translated and transmitted through socialization to apply to members of outgroups (Green et al., 2010; Schwartz et al., 2012; Schroeder & Epley, 2016). Given that "humanness is not ascribed to the same degree to everyone," (van Noorden et al.,, 2014, p. 320), socialization experiences rooted in language, images (Schroeder & Epley, 2016), and interactions can foment stereotypes and biases that influence dehumanization. 

This presentation is grounded in literature linking fear-based xenophobia (Veer et al., 2013), disgust responses (Green et al., 2010), prejudicial attitudes (Joffe & Staerkle, 2007), and narrative responses to illustrate processes by which immigrants and people of Color are portrayed, experience inhumane treatment, and are marginalized (Dovidio et al., 2010). More specifically, this presentation seeks to contextualize the role of clinicians, educators, supervisors, and consultants in addressing an indispensable macro-level social understanding of inclusion/exclusion, and the human experience within a polarized and a diverse sociopolitical setting. Objectives will be advanced through the use of discussion, case studies and personal reflection.

 
Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  analyze the understanding of outgroup derogation/dehumanization through discussion of experimental and narrative findings.
2.  examine and conceptualize related to system-legitimizing narratives that serve to maintain harmful depictions of people of Color and immigrants at various stages of development.
3.  discuss at least 3 ways in which dehumanization, contamination theory, fear, threat, outgroup dynamics, and internalized messages intersect within clinical, supervisory, and educational settings.

 
Presentation #7:  "Clinical Supervision of Psychotherapy for Serious Mental Illness: A Meaning-Making Approach"
Jay Hamm, PsyD, HSPP
1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Despite its importance in the provision of mental health treatment, the availability of high-quality clinical supervision faces numerous threats in many settings. Access to high-quality supervision may be especially important for therapists providing recovery-oriented services to persons diagnosed with serious mental illness. In this presentation I will detail one supervisory approach that has been developed with these considerations in mind; namely, the supervision approach associated with the recovery-oriented integrative therapy Metacognitive Reflection and Insight Therapy. I will detail three aspects of this approach that have broad appeal and could be easily incorporated into other psychotherapy approaches which include i) reflecting with supervisees about their experience of the patient, themselves and the therapeutic relationship, ii) helping supervisees respond to patients' pain and fragmentation with interventions that promote challenge and joint meaning making, and iii) dealing with threats to this process from both internal pressures within supervisees as well as those posed externally from their agencies.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  summarize the key barriers to high-quality clinical supervision for serious mental illness.
2.  list the three major components of a meaning-making supervisory approach.
3.  apply recovery-oriented principles to the provision of clinical supervision of psychotherapy for serious mental illness.


 
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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11th

7:45 - 8:00 Sponsor Messages

8:00 - 9:30 Concurrent Presentations #8 & #9 

 
Presentation #8:  "Healing the Whole Person"
Jim Schroeder, PhD, HSPP

1.5 Category I CE
 
Program Description:
The presentation focuses on research-supported methods of healing that are holistic nature. The emphasis is placed on how different dimensions of our being (i.e., physical, psychological, social, and spiritual) can both cause challenges in other aspects of our lives, but also be sources of healing and comfort. In addition, the presentation focuses on ways that professionals can better understand and address how lifestyle factors and everyday habits can better be integrated into treatment of clients, and also into personal self-care.
 
Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  summarize research related to how symptoms in one aspect of life (e.g., psychological) are affect by other aspects (e.g., physical).
2.  describe ways that information about holistic findings can be applied to treatment.
3.  describe the benefits of taking a holistic approach to care.

 

Presentation #9:  "Adapting Evidence-Based Practices for Gender Diverse Youth in Outpatient Mental Health Settings"
Melissa K Hord, PhD, HSPP
Amanda V Broderick, PhD, HSPP

1.5 Category I CE

Program Description:
Gender diverse youth experience elevated mental health symptoms relative to their cisgender peers and early medical intervention and mental health support improve outcomes (Edwards-Leeper, Feldman, Lash, Shumer, & Tishelman, 2017). Many evidence-based practices have been identified for working with youth who have a variety of mental health concerns (https://www.samhsa.gov/resource-search/ebp) and recent research suggests a need for adapting these practices in order to meet the needs of gender diverse youth (Austin & Craig, 2015).  This presentation is aimed at clinicians who have training or expertise in using evidence-based psychological treatments for youth and are interested in providing gender-affirming care targeting depression, anxiety, self-harm, and other common co-occurring mental health symptoms. We will briefly review terms, gender-affirming medical interventions, and recommendations from national and international health organizations regarding provision of these services to youth. We will discuss research on gender identity development in childhood and adolescence (Spencer, Berg, Bradford, Vencill, Tellawi, & Rider, 2021) and the clinician’s role in supporting identity development. Finally, we will examine clinical considerations for working with this population, including individual, family, and social factors (Leibowitz & Janssen, 2018) that can impact treatment targets and explore how existing skills in family and individual therapy can address those factors.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  summarize research on gender identity development in childhood and adolescence.
2.  develop treatment targets appropriate for gender diverse youth. 
3.  adapt existing evidence-based clinical skills to address mental health needs of gender diverse youth. 

 
9:30 - 9:50 Sponsor Messages & Break

9:50 - 11:20 Concurrent Presentations #10 & #11

 
Presentation #10:  "Assessment of Psychosis Through the Lifetime" 
Bethany L. Leonhardt, PsyD, HSPP
Jacqueline Abate, PsyD, HSPP


1.5 Category I CE
 
Program Description:
This presentation will offer an in-depth look at psychological assessment of psychosis and related mental health diagnoses. We will review interview questions to help ascertain psychotic symptoms, communication strategies when working with individuals with suspected psychosis, psychological assessments that are useful in creating an integrative report/diagnosis of severe mental illness, and treatment recommendations specific to fostering recovery for individuals experiencing psychosis. We will describe research regarding conceptual models of early severe mental illness, including important diagnostic differentials. We will review important clinical considerations for individuals at different timepoints in life, ranging from first episode psychosis to prolonged psychosis.

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  summarize the differential diagnosis for psychotic and related severe mental illness diagnoses.
2.  apply interview techniques to ascertain someone's experience of psychosis. 
3.  apply recovery oriented treatment recommendations for individuals experiencing psychosis. 
4.  describe clinical considerations for psychosis across different points of the lifespan.

 
Presentation #11:  "Dismantling Ableism through Neurodivergent Diagnosis Delivery"
Susan M. Wilczynski, PhD, BCBA-D
1.5 Category I CE
 
Program Description:

Client response to a diagnosis can lead to very different trajectories, with some clients quickly seeking resources and strategies to enhance their quality of life and others feeling helpless, hopeless, or mournful. People in the United States live in an ableist culture so psychologists cannot avoid developing implicit biases about disabled people. In addition, graduate schools train psychologists in the medical model of disability, which pathologizes differences and underscores deficits instead of strengths. It is not surprising that biases enter into our engagement with clients and their families and that we deliver diagnoses in a manner that ignores or underemphasizes strengths and highlights deficits unless we take decisive action to alter our professional interactions. To increase the probability psychologists will deliver diagnoses in a way that produces a positive client trajectory for their clients, we must develop and apply strategies for both recognizing our own biases and dismantling ableism in the way we deliver diagnoses. This presentation begins with a brief overview of implicit bias and an introduction to ableism. I will provide examples of how ableism enters into the interpretation of client profiles and the delivery of diagnoses. The presentation will conclude with strategies for recalibrating assessment interpretation and diagnosis delivery so that we more effectively focus on client strengths while acknowledging challenges a client or their family may face.
 
Learning Objectives: 

By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  define and provide examples of implicit bias and ableism.
2.  describe how their interpretation of assessment results and/or delivery of a diagnosis results from their own implicit biases around ableism.
3.  identify at least three methods of dismantling ableism in their assessment interpretation and/or diagnosis delivery.

 
 
11:20 - 11:40 Sponsor Messages & Break

11:40 - 12:40 Annual Award Presentations

12:40 - 1:00 Sponsor Messages & Break

1:00 - 2:30 Concurrent Presentations #12 & #13

 
Presentation #12:  "Empirically-Supported Clinical Practice in Specialty Areas: The Quick-Start Guide to Fostering Multicultural Competency "
Stephanie J. Cunningham, PhD, HSPP
Danielle Henderson, PhD, HSPP
Patrick Murphy, MSEd
Michelle K. Williams, BS


1.5 Category I CE
 
Program Description:
The American Psychological Association creates and promulgates professional guidelines to support psychologists with their work in different specialty areas and in serving diverse populations. The guidelines provide state of the art information on best practices for these aspects of applied psychology, developed by psychologists with domain-specific expertise and drawing upon the most current relevant research. As such, these guidelines are the most streamlined way to attain a foundational idea of the knowledge and skills needed to engage competently in a particular aspect of psychological practice. Multicultural competency is one such core aspect of our work as psychologists, but without a clear framework for application it can feel daunting to translate the concept of cultural humility into practice or feel assured that a sufficient level of competency is present.The APA practice guidelines are an excellent way to quickly "get up to speed" with working with populations that have been identified as having unique clinical needs or areas for attention in providing culturally-competent care, or to otherwise ensure that principles of cultural humility are effectively incorporated into other aspects of practice. In this presentation, members of the IPA Diversity Committee will provide information on the APA professional practice guidelines, including what they are, how to access them, how to apply them to clinical work, and brief introduction to the content. The presentation will review examples of these resources, address their particular utility for fostering multicultural competency in clinical work, and offer opportunity for practical application of the guidelines.  

Learning Objectives:
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.    describe the purpose and utility of the American Psychological Association's various professional practice guidelines.
2.    summarize prominent themes present in the professional practice guidelines as relates to multicultural competency and work with specific diverse populations.
3.    apply the content of the professional practice guidelines as part of engaging in culturally-aware clinical practice.


Presentation #13:  "Addressing Myths and Implementation Barriers of Exposure Therapy in OCD and Anxiety"
Heather M. Plinovich, PhD, HSPP

1.5 Category I CE
 
Program Description:
A large body of evidence supports the efficacy of exposure and response prevention (ERP) or exposure therapy for the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and anxiety disorders (e.g., panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, phobias) and is considered first-line treatment for these disorders. Despite decades of empirical evidence, many therapists do not use exposure therapy in their work. Those who do employ exposure therapy often encounter implementation challenges and barriers. This presentation first addresses the misconceptions and dissemination challenges of exposure therapy. These include 1) concerns related to the generalizability of manualized treatments; 2) fear of negative patient/parent reactions to exposures; 3) mistaken beliefs that exposures cause harm; 4) practical limitations such as session length and workplace policies; and 5) lack of training and resources. Secondly, this presentation addresses implementation challenges of exposure therapy. These include 1) setting the foundation for exposure therapy (e.g., clear explanation of treatment rationale and trajectory, therapeutic alliance); 2) confidently identify and addressing core fears; 3) pitfalls of encouraging distraction, providing reassurance, or catering to excessive emotional distress during exposure; 4) effective handling of covert safety behaviors and rumination; 5) knowing when to use interoceptive, in vivo, or imaginal exposures; 6) working with significant others and family; 7) use of exposures that do not contribute to minority stress; 8) incorporating other evidence-based interventions; and 9) adapting exposures in the context of COVID-19. Alleviating clinicians'  concerns related to the use and implementation of exposure therapy will hopefully encourage wider adoption of its use. Ultimately this benefits consumers who will have greater access to effective evidence-based treatments. 

Learning Objectives: 
By completing this program, participants will able to:
1.  dispel misconceptions related to the use of exposure therapy.
2.  solve issues related to practical limitations and lack of training/resources related to exposure therapy.
3.  identify implementation challenges that prevent effective delivery of exposure therapy.
4.  apply nuanced exposure therapy interventions in the context of implementation challenges.
5.  apply exposure interventions that do not contribute to minority stress.


 
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PRESENTER BIOGRAPHIES
Click here for a link to 2022 IPA Fall Conference Presenter Biographies


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SPECIAL NOTE TO CONFERENCE ATTENDEES
The Indiana Psychological Association (IPA) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Indiana Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • Indiana State Psychology Board and Indiana Behavioral Health Board:  IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for psychologists. IPA is an approved provider of Category I continuing education for LSW, LCSW, LMFT, LMHC, LMFTA, LCAC and LAC.
  • Licensees must judge the program's relevance to their professional practice.
Please note that APA rules require that credit be given only to those who attend the entire workshop(s). Those arriving more than 15 minutes after the scheduled start time or leaving early will not receive CE credits. Partial credit cannot be given. Attendance will be recorded via the webinar platform. 

Attendees will be responsible for answering the presentation evaluations for the presentations attended. IPA will e-mail a link with a survey evaluation for each presentation to each registered attendee on the day of the event.

All licensees requesting Category I CE credits will receive a certificate from IPA confirming the number of credits earned for each session. These certificates will be delivered via email approximately 2-6 weeks after the conference. IPA will not produce any kind of "attendance" certificate for students.


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REGISTRATION

Registration ends Wednesday, November 9th, 2022.

IF REGISTERING FOR SOMEONE ELSE, please only register one person per transaction and use the attendee's email address. All correspondence must go to the attendee. Contact Connie Vore at admin@indianapsychology.org if you have any questions or need any assistance. 

Cancellation/Refund Policy: IPA will not provide refunds for registration cancellations since all registrants can obtain Category I CE credit for all 13 sessions via IPA's Homestudy program. Contact info@indianapsychology.org if you have any questions.

FEES - MEMBERS:  Members must login (through Registration link) to receive the Members discount.
$260 IPA BASIC, EMERITUS - RETIRED, ACADEMIC Members
$220 IPA PREMIER, NEW, EMERITUS - PRACTICING Members
$0 IPA STUDENT Members 
$0 IPA PLATINUM Members

FEES - NON-MEMBERS:
$315 Psychologists & Other Professionals
*If a non-member Student seeking to attend, please either join IPA (free membership with "sponsorship" by an IPA Academic Member or, if outside the state of Indiana, please contact info@indianapsychology.org.

Special Note to Non-Members:  Non-Members may apply to join and, upon acceptance, we will credit your account for the difference in the Fall Conference rate, effectively reducing your 2022 conference cost by $115. We will also begin your membership immediately so you will benefit from membership for the remainder of 2022 and into 2023!

Submit membership application online for membership. Contact the IPA office for details at (317)257-7449 or contact Connie Vore at admin@indianapsychology.org.

Note to Presenters: Presenters will receive a discount code via e-mail that can be applied during registration. Contact the IPA office for details at (317)257-7449 or contact Connie Vore at admin@indianapsychology.org.


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SPONSORS
If you are interested in advertising/sponsoring at the Conference, contact info@indianapsychology.org.


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Please contact info@indianapsychology.org or admin@indianapsychology.org if you have additional questions.

 
Location
UNITED STATES
Contact Person
Outlook/vCalendar/Google
Click on the icon next to the date(s) to add to your calendar:
11/10/2022 - 11/11/2022  


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